Tumeric cures cancer

From: System 1 Nov 2015 06:42
To: ALL1 of 3
From:  Razz (RAZZMAN)  
 To:  ALL
7242.1 
I have been taking turmeric supplements for years. However, a friend clipped out an article about how turmeric can help relieve asthma symptoms. After reading it and doing some research, I went to a natural food store Feel Rite and bought some organic turmeric powder. I tried it and it seemed to help. Then I came across and article that told how turmeric can be used to treat skin cancer. I have a little basal cell skin cancer on the side of my face, so I tried that. It's too early for results, but there are plenty of articles about how turmeric can be used to treat all sorts of cancer.

Curcumin is the ground root of turmeric and seems to be the main ingredient that has all the healing powers.

Here's a good Youtube video about the benefits of using turmeric from arthritis, to cancer, to diabetes. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GIQ_9lnNlyc

I went onto the Natural News site and did a search for articles there. Here's a good one...

http://www.naturalnews.com/041642_turmeric_curcumin_drug_alternatives.html
     
Sacred herb turmeric may make at least 14 pharmaceutical drugs utterly obsolete

Thursday, August 15, 2013 by: Jonathan Benson, staff writer


(NaturalNews) You may have already heard about the many amazing healing properties of the spice turmeric, which is also sometimes referred to as curcumin. But did you know that literally thousands of published, peer-reviewed studies conducted and compiled over the years lend credence to the notion that turmeric works the same as, or even better than, at least 14 pharmaceutical drugs currently on the market?

It is true, and thanks to the diligent work of GreenMedInfo.com's Sayer Ji in compiling this valuable information, it is now available publicly for the benefit of your and your family's health. Many of the most commonly prevalent chronic illnesses, it turns out, can be prevented, treated, and even cured using turmeric, so you will want to pay attention. Here are seven drugs and classes of drugs that science shows can be effectively replaced with turmeric:

1) Statin drugs for cholesterol. Popular cholesterol drugs like Lipitor (atorvastatin calcium) and Crestor (rosuvastatin) are completely unnecessary when taking standardized doses of curcuminoids extracted from turmeric, according to a 2008 study published in the journal Drugs in R & D. Researchers found that in patients with endothelial dysfunction, the underlying blood vessel pathology that leads to atherosclerosis, turmeric extract worked at least as good as the drugs at reducing inflammation and relieving oxidative stress in type 2 diabetics.

2) Corticosteroid drugs. Millions of people receive steroid injections every year to treat the inflammation associated with conditions like arthritis and even cancer. But a 1999 study published in the journal Phytotherapy Research found that turmeric's primary antioxidant, curcumin, works just as well as steroid medications in the treatment of inflammatory eye disease. Several studies released in the years following found similar benefits for other inflammatory diseases commonly treated with steroids.

3) Antidepressants. Besides their copious side effects, antidepressant drugs like Prozac (fluoxetine) and Paxil (paroxetine) are extremely risky, as they can actually make depression symptoms worse for some people. But why even bother to use them when turmeric has been shown to effectively reduce depressive behavior the same or even better than these dangerous drugs?

4) Blood thinners. People at high risk of heart attack or stroke, or who require blood-thinning drugs to avoid these and other cardiovascular events, may simply be able to take turmeric instead. This suggestion is based on a 1986 study published in the journal Arzneimittelforschung, which found that curcumin has similar anti-platelet and prostacyclin modulating effects as aspirin, the blood-thinning drug of choice for many conventional doctors.

5) Anti-inflammatory drugs. Aspirin is also commonly prescribed for other inflammatory conditions, as is ibuprofen, naproxen sodium, and a number of other pain pills. But these may be unnecessary as turmeric was shown in a 2004 study published in the journal Oncogene to exert similar anti-inflammatory and anti-proliferative activity, particularly against cancer cells, as these drugs.

6) Chemotherapy drugs. The cancer industry would have us all believe that chemotherapy drugs are one of the few methods we have at our disposal to treat cancer. But a 2007 study published in the International Journal of Cancer found that curcumin works just as well as oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) at treating colorectal cancer.

7) Diabetes drugs. Not only is turmeric a viable contender in treating diabetes, a 2009 study published in the journal Biochemistry and Biophysical Research Community found that it works up to 100,000 times better than the popular diabetes drug Metformin at increasing glucose uptake. Turmeric also helps suppress glucose production in the liver at least as well as the most popular diabetes drugs on the market today.

Beyond this, turmeric is a powerful cancer-fighting herb as well, which Ji expounds upon further in his turmeric review. Be sure to check it out at:
http://www.greenmedinfo.com

Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/041642_turmeric_curcumin_drug_alternatives.html#ixzz2iptOI9YZ

Here's a way to get turmeric into your diet according to Natural News...

http://www.naturalnews.com/040648_turmeric_healing_spices_curcumin.html


Seven ways to get more super-healing turmeric in your diet

Monday, May 27, 2013 by: PF Louis


(NaturalNews) You probably know by now that turmeric has been acknowledged as a potent anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, and anti-cancer substance. Turmeric is a rhizome with edible roots that grow underground horizontally. It's actually related to ginger and somewhat resembles it outwardly.

Turmeric's active ingredient, curcumin, is often extracted and used in many clinical studies for cancer and chronic inflammation such as rheumatoid arthritis.

But there are ways to enjoy turmeric as a spice to please your palate and add its active ingredient, curcumin, as a daily part of your body's biological chemistry.

Regardless of recipe differences, keep in mind that for optimum curcumin absorption from turmeric, three basic elements are required: cooking heat, a touch of black pepper for nutrient absorbing piperine, and a healthy fat of your choice to protect the turmeric's curcumin from stomach acids before entering the small intestines.

You can choose one or two fats from the following cold-pressed or organic fat sources: Ghee, almond oil, olive oil, coconut oil, coconut milk, almond milk, or goat and cow milk. Soy milk and Canola oil are not the best choices.

Easy ways to add more turmeric into your diet
(1) Turmeric can spice up your rice dishes. It's especially appropriate for organic white basmati or Indian "parboiled" rice. Parboiled white rice is often from India, and it is nutritious and digestible enough to be recommended by Ayurvedic doctors (http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-parboiled-rice.htm).

By the way, Asian rices generally contain less arsenic than domestic rices.

Make sure the rice isn't overcooked or soggy, then lightly stir-fry the rice in a suitable pan with a cold-pressed organic oil of your choice sprinkled with black pepper. Add some chopped cilantro and/or whatever salivates your taste buds.

(2) Eggs can be fried or scrambled using butter or coconut oil with a liberal sprinkle of turmeric and sea salt. Don't forget the pepper.

(3) Spicy lentils. Use green or brown lentils that can be cooked in around a half-hour with a two-to-one liquid to lentil ratio. You might try organic vegetable stock instead of purified, fluoride-free water.

When the lentils are almost done, lightly stir fry-turmeric powder in ghee or coconut oil. Mix the turmeric and oil and with the lentils and some black pepper.

(4) You can create a similar dish with chick peas or garbanzo beans. If you use canned garbanzo beans, make sure they are organic and the cans are labeled BPA-free. But it's healthier and cheaper if you simply soak dry bulk organic chick peas in pure water overnight and boil them for a half-hour or so.

Either way, coat the chick peas with plenty of turmeric powder, black pepper, and some sea salt mixed with an organic cold-pressed oil of your choice. Then lightly roast the mixture on a medium level oven setting for 15 to 20 minutes.

(5) A cooling turmeric summer elixir can be prepared by first boiling some turmeric root, letting it cool down somewhat, discarding the root and adding honey, lemon or lime, and a dash of ground turmeric with a pinch of black pepper. Pour over ice and enjoy.

(6) How about a smoothie? You can blend a half or a whole banana with some grated or powdered ginger, raw honey, freshly squeezed lemon juice, a teaspoon of bee pollen with two teaspoons of turmeric paste made by stirring turmeric over heat in ghee or coconut oil and black pepper.

Blend with activated almond milk. Dana will tell you how to make activated almond milk here (http://www.foodcoachnyc.com).

(7) Here's a convenient way to ensure your daily turmeric: Prepare a turmeric paste that you can refrigerate for several days and use to quickly prepare a "Golden Milk". Here's a show and tell for that (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYCQb2YNGt4).

Sources for this article include:

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-9206/10-ways-to-get-more-turmeric.html

http://honestcooking.com/sidelicious-colorful-vegan-turmeric-rice/

http://vegetarian.about.com/od/morerecipes/r/TurmericTea.htm

http://www.turmericforhealth.com

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jYCQb2YNGt4

Not only can turmeric help cure cancer, relieve asthma and arthritis symptoms, but it also can help prevent heart attacks. I have just ordered 3 more turmeric products to add to the ground turmeric powder and supplements I have.

http://www.naturalnews.com/040330_turmeric_heart_health_curcumin.html


Turmeric compounds improve heart health as much as exercise

Tuesday, May 14, 2013 by: David Gutierrez, staff writer


NaturalNews) A chemical that naturally occurs in turmeric root appears to improve heart health as much as moderate aerobic exercise, according to a trio of studies conducted by researchers from the University of Tsukuba in Japan.

Turmeric root has been an important component of traditional Asian medicinal systems for hundreds of years. In recent decades, scientific studies have confirmed the potent anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant properties of the trio of turmeric chemicals known as "curcuminoids," which give the root its distinctive yellow-orange color. Although only one of these chemicals is properly known as "curcumin," the name is commonly used to refer to all of them collectively.

The three new studies all compared the effects of exercise and curcumin on heart health and postmenopausal women over an eight-week period. All the studies were randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled. Curcumin was delivered by means of colloidal nanoparticles.

Can turmeric prevent heart disease?
In the first study, researchers assigned 32 women to either take a curcumin supplement, engage in moderate aerobic exercise training, or undergo no intervention at all. The researchers measured participants' vascular endothelial function - the responsiveness of the layer of cells that line the blood vessels, a key indicator of overall cardiovascular health - both at the beginning and end of the study. They found that while there was no improvement in the control group, endothelial function significantly increased in both the exercise and curcumin groups. Most surprisingly, the improvement in the two experimental groups was identical.

The second study examined curcumin's effects on the responsiveness of arteries to changes in blood pressure ("arterial compliance"), another key measure of cardiovascular health. In this study, 32 women were randomly assigned to receive either a curcumin supplement or a placebo pill, or to undergo an exercise routine plus either a curcumin or placebo pill. The researchers found no significant improvement in the control group, significant (and equivalent) improvements in both the exercise-only and curcumin-only groups, and the greatest improvement among participants who exercised and also took the supplements.

In the final study, researchers examined the effects of exercise and curcumin on the rate of age-related degeneration of the heart's left ventricle. 45 participants were randomly assigned into one of the same four groups used in the second study.

The researchers once again found that both exercise and curcumin produced significant increases in heart health. In this study, however, curcumin alone did not appear to provide any benefit. Specifically, brachial systolic blood pressure (SBP) decreased among participants who exercised, whether or not they took curcumin. In addition, heart-rate-corrected aortic augmentation index (AIx) and aortic SBP both decreased significantly only among participants who both exercised and took curcumin.

"Regular ingestion of curcumin could be a preventive measure against cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women," the authors of the first study wrote. "Furthermore, our results suggest that curcumin may be a potential alternative ... for patients who are unable to exercise."

Curcumin is best absorbed from turmeric root, rather than from supplements.

Sources for this article include:
http://www.vitalchoice.com/shop/pc/articlesViewprint.asp?id=1953

http://www.prohealth.com/library/showarticle.cfm?libid=17666
 
From: System 1 Nov 2015 06:43
To: ALL2 of 3
From:  Razz (RAZZMAN)  
 To:  ALL
7242.4 
Turmeric can not only help fight disease, but it can spice up your meals. Here's some dishes and other beneficial uses of turmeric...


http://www.mnn.com/health/fitness-well-being/stories/22-surprising-uses-for-turmeric

22 surprising uses for turmeric

Along with its anti-inflammatory benefits, this antioxidant-rich staple from the spice rack can be used for everything from dying Easter eggs to whitening teeth.

By Melissa Breyer
Tue, Mar 19 2013 at 3:09 PM


One of the most fetching culinary spices, turmeric has an intense golden hue. The major ingredient in Indian curries, turmeric is the component responsible for curry’s dizzying color; it’s also commonly used to imbue mustard with its radiant glow.
 
We’re commonly reminded to eat colorful plant foods because their pigments, which are associated with antioxidants — the wonder nutrients that experts believe protect and repair cells from damage caused by free radicals and that also have important anti-inflammatory properties. Turmeric’s intense color makes it a front-runner in this group of foods; curcumin, a compound found only in turmeric, appears to be the magic ingredient.
 
A cousin of ginger, this rhizome has a long history of use in herbal remedies, particularly in China, India and Indonesia. Many current studies are looking into turmeric to treat a whole host of health problems, and turmeric has ample other uses as well, as evidenced in the following applications.
 
1. Brighten your pearly whites
Former Miss USA Susie Castillo swears by her recipe for homemade toothpaste, which includes turmeric powder. Although turmeric is known for its staining prowess, it is commonly (if not counter-intuitively) used to whiten teeth – presumably it’s not in contact with the enamel long enough to change the color. Here’s how to make your own version, and you can also sprinkle some on your commercial or other homemade toothpaste and brush as usual.
 
2. Customize foundation
Ashy makeup makes a bad match for luminous skin. Actor Thandie Newton tackles the problem by adding turmeric to tinted moisturizer to achieve a perfect glow that matches her skin tone. And in fact, women in India often use turmeric in face creams and body scrubs to boost the glow factor; sprinkle in a bit at a time until you have the proper tone.
 
3. Spice up your soap
If you make homemade soap, adding several teaspoons of turmeric to it will not only dial up its color, but will boost its skin-friendly benefits as well.
 
4. Save your scalp
Many swear by a combination of olive oil and turmeric to deter dandruff and to improve the overall condition of the scalp. Make a mix of turmeric and the oil of your choice (jojoba or coconut oil would be nice), massage into your scalp and leave on for 15 minutes, then shampoo and style as usual.
 
5. Embellish temporary tattoos
Use turmeric to create golden Mehndi, the temporary tattoos made with henna, or to add a pretty second color to an extant henna tattoo.
 
6. Diminish sprain strain
A traditional homeopathic sprain treatment involves making a paste using one part salt and two parts turmeric and enough water to make it spreadable. Apply to the affected joint and wrap in an old cloth that you don’t mind staining. Leave on for 20 minutes to an hour, once a day. (Don’t do this on body parts that can be seen; you don’t want a temporary yellow tinge!) Also of note: the University of Maryland Medical Center suggests taking turmeric to help reduce sprain swelling and makes the effect of bromelain (an anti-inflammatory derived from pineapple enzymes) stronger. Take 250 to 500 milligrams (mg) each of turmeric and bromelain, three times a day between meals.
 
7. Help tame swimmer’s ear
Natural remedy aficionados recommend using warmed garlic oil to help push the water out of ears affected by swimming; adding turmeric to the mix is said to help as well. See home remedies for swimmer’s ear for more.
 
8. Soothe a sick stomach
Turmeric has long used to quell bellies that aren’t behaving properly. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) recommends 500 mg of turmeric four times daily to treat an upset stomach.
 
9. Ease achy arthritis
For osteoarthritis, NIH recommends 500 mg twice daily of a specific turmeric extract (like Meriva, Indena); 500 mg four times daily of a non-commercial product has also been used. For rheumatoid arthritis, they note that 500mg twice daily of a specific formulation of curcumin (like BCM-95, Arjuna Natural Extracts, India) can be used.
 
10. Love your liver
According to early experimental research at the Medical University Graz in Austria, the curcumin in turmeric may delay liver damage that can eventually lead to cirrhosis.
 
11. Inhibit skin cancer
Turmeric seems to hold much promise for skin treatments, as well as possibly inhibiting certain forms of cancer. Among other studies, researchers at the University of Texas note that curcumin inhibits the growth of melanoma and may also impede the spread of breast cancer to the lungs.
 
12. Battle other forms of cancer
The American Cancer Society says that laboratory studies have shown that curcumin interferes with several important molecular pathways involved in cancer development, growth and spread. Researchers have reported that curcumin can kill cancer cells in laboratory dishes and also slows the growth of the surviving cells. Human studies of curcumin in cancer prevention and treatment are in the early stages.
 
13. Minimize Alzheimer’s symptoms
A clinical trial using curcumin extract published in the Journal of Neurochemistry found a 30 percent decrease in the size of Alzheimer's-associated brain plaque in treated mice — in only one week. 
 
14. Make longevity tea
Dr. Andrew Weil notes that people in Okinawa, the Japanese island nation with the world's longest average life span, drink turmeric tea daily. To make your own, boil four cups of water, add one teaspoon of ground turmeric, allow to simmer for 10 minutes, strain, and add ginger and/or honey to taste.
 
15. Use as dye for spicy tie-dyed tees
Yes, turmeric stains fabric … which means that it's an awesome fabric dye. Add three tablespoons of turmeric to a pot of boiling water, let it simmer for a while, and your dye bath is ready. (See more at this photo tutorial.)
 
16. Make marigold-colored play dough
Homemade play dough is as much fun to make as it is to play with once it’s made. And coloring it is especially fun. This recipe instructs on how to make it from scratch, and also how to turn it into a rainbow of colors using, among other natural ingredients, turmeric. (Bonus tip: You can scent homemade play dough with vanilla or peppermint extract.)
 
17. Naturally dye Easter eggs
There’s something magical about mashing up natural dyestuffs in bowls and watching hard-boiled eggs transform into the jewel-like colors found in nature rather than in the lab. Beet juice, onion skin, blueberries, and of course, turmeric all do a bang-up job of the task. Get the how-to here: Eco Easter eggs.
 
18. Make meat safer
Kansas State University researchers discovered that adding turmeric to meat can reduce the levels of heterocyclic amines (HCAs) by up to 40 percent. HCAs form on chicken and meat when cooked over high heat, like in grilling. Consumption of HCAs is linked to higher rates of cancer.
 
19. Enliven bland food
While Frito-Lay may rely on Yellow 6 and Red 40 to enhance its preternaturally vivid snacks like Cheetos and Nacho Cheese Doritos, you can skip the nasty artificial colors and add a dash of turmeric to brighten up otherwise insipid-looking food. Whimsical cooks and moms alike can benefit from adding it to eggs, mashed potatoes, soups, cauliflower, or anywhere else a bit of vibrancy is desired.
 
20. Blend your own curry powder
If there’s one thing turmeric is famous for, it’s the starring role in Indian curry. (There comes a point in every young Western cook’s life when they realize that curry isn’t one single spice, but a blend of many.) Making your own curry blend is simple and tastes remarkably bright and fresh; and you can customize it to reflect your personal taste. A good place to start is here.
 
21. Make delicious dishes
No “uses for turmeric” article would be complete without reminding the reader of all the wonderful food that can be made with turmeric, even if it may not be the most surprising use on the list. Therefore, see: 5 dishes infused with curry.
 
22. And last but not least, bake a cake!
Turmeric cake? Indeed. This Lebanese dessert is not too sweet and has an odd little earthy kick to it compliments of the turmeric. Find a basic recipe here and a vegan recipe here.
 
Note: Turmeric can be taken in powder or pill form, but use with caution and consult with your doctor first. It’s strong stuff. According to the National Institutes of Health, it is unsafe during pregnancy, can make gallbladder problems worse, can make stomach problems such as GERD (or Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease) worse, and can slow blood clotting and might cause extra bleeding during and after surgery.

While I have been taking turmeric supplements for years, I had no idea how many ailments it can help. I started on my new information search on turmeric this week when a friend at work gave me a clipped out newspaper article about how turmeric can help relieve asthma symptoms.

Here's one of the articles I came across...

http://turmericforhealth.com/turmeric-cures/how-to-use-turmeric-for-asthma

How to use Turmeric for Asthma

A common upper respiratory tract disease affecting many people including children is asthma. An asthma attack causes inflammation of the lining of the lungs and airways. Phlegm or mucous may also get trapped in the airways. This in turn makes breathing difficult. Medications such as steroids, expectorants and bronchodilators are generally used to relieve the inflammation. But, they cause side effects in few people. A safe natural herb to relieve symptoms of asthma is turmeric. Use of turmeric for asthma offers quick relief.

Turmeric is root of the perennial plant Curcuma longa. It has thick brown skin and orange colored flesh. Turmeric that is similar to ginger is used as food and as a therapeutic agent. It is also known as Indian saffron or haldi. Turmeric is being used since centuries in Chinese and Indian medicine.

Properties of turmeric

    Yellowish orange in color.

    Strong odor.

    Peppery and slightly bitter taste.

    Possess anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant property.

    Rich source of minerals manganese, potassium and iron, vitamins B6 and fiber.

The anti-inflammatory action of curcumin relieves inflammation of the air ways and tightness of chest associated with asthma.
How to use turmeric for asthma?

Turmeric can be used to treat symptoms of asthma in various ways.

    Relieving congestion of bronchi: To relieve blocked bronchi turmeric has to be taken with salt mixed in hot water. Licking one teaspoon of turmeric along with ½ tsp of honey also offers relief from congestion of bronchi.
    Eliminate phlegm: Mix turmeric powder, banana ash and barley powder in equal proportions along with honey. Have this paste four to five times in a day to get rid of phlegm.
    Relieve irritation of bronchioles: Mix turmeric powder, ghee and black pepper powder to make a paste. Massage the chest and throat region using the paste to reduce irritation of the bronchioles.
    Burn turmeric till red hot and inhale the smoke. The smoke serves as a strong expectorant.
    Breathing problem commonly observed in asthma patients can be relieved by taking turmeric that is partially roasted and later ground using hot water.
    Boil a small piece of turmeric in milk. Now, sweeten the milk with jaggery and have it to obtain relief from asthma.
    Intake of 1/4tsp of turmeric along with a small glass of hot water helps prevent asthma attacks.

Recommended dosage of turmeric for asthma relief

Use of turmeric supplements in children is not yet studied. Hence, there is no recommended dosage for children. For adults the turmeric dosage depends on the form of turmeric being taken.

    1.5 – 3 g of cut root per day.
    1 – 3 g of dried and powdered root per day.
    400 – 600 mg of curcumin powder 3 times per day.
    30 – 90 drops of fluid extract (1:1) per day.
    15 – 30 drops of tincture (1:2) 4 times per day.

The dosage requirements may vary depending on your health status and tolerance levels. Hence, consult the physician before taking turmeric for asthma in any form to prevent complications.
Turmeric treatment for Asthmatic Bouts

Asthmatic bouts are a difficult period, especially if they occur very frequently. Turmeric can be effectively used for the same. I was reading a book by K H Krishnamurty, a well known writer on natural cure and herbal remedies. He suggests the following use of turmeric for Asthmatic bouts:

    Take 3 gms of turmeric powder and mix it with powder of 7 grains of black pepper. Mix this with pure mustard oil. Patient should lick this paste in the morning.
    Grind ~110 grams of Calotropis (also known as milk weed) and ~55 grams of turmeric. Use approx. Add 110 grams of any bitter oil in the mixture and then cook it till watery portion vanishes and only oil remains. Bring down the vessel and then let it cool. Strain the oil using a clean cloth and store the oil. This all has to applied to back, chest, belly and front throat through sprinkling it and through fomentation also.

Both of the above have to be carried for a week and monitor the condition. Several dietary precautions also need to be taken along with the treatment so to avoid any digestion related stress. Patients should:

    Not eat excessive fried and spicy food
    Should avoid consuming food such as jaggery, curd, black gram etc.
    Should avoid eating stale food
    Eat as much as green leafy vegetables, rice, wheat, etc. – basically very light meal

Selecting and storing of turmeric

If you suffer frequently from upper respiratory tract infections then it is highly recommended to store turmeric at home. To retain the medicinal value of the herb and to prevent mold infestations it has to be stored appropriately.

Consider purchasing turmeric from herbal stores renowned for offering genuine herbs. As mistaken by many color of turmeric is not an indicator for quality of the herb. If genuine turmeric powder cannot be found in the local stores then make turmeric powder from fresh roots by boiling, drying and grinding the dried roots.

Store turmeric powder in sealed tins and place them in dry, dark and cool place. Store the fresh root in refrigerator.

Lastly, use of turmeric for asthma should offer relief in ten minutes. If you do not find relief seek immediate medical attention.

It isn't only Natural News that has articles on the benefits of using turmeric. Just Google "turmeric benefits" and you'll get a ton of sites to explore.

Here's one of them...

http://www.mindbodygreen.com/0-6873/25-Reasons-Why-Turmeric-Can-Heal-You.html

25 Reasons Why Turmeric Can Heal You

By Jessica Cooper
November 21, 2012 12:18 PM



Turmeric grows wild in the forests of South and Southeast Asia. It's one of the key ingredients in many Pakistani, Indian, Persian and Thai dishes and has incredible medicinal value, too. 
 
Here are some of the benefits when ingested with your food as a spice:
  1. It is a natural antiseptic and antibacterial agent, useful in disinfecting cuts and burns.
  2. When combined with cauliflower, it has shown to prevent prostate cancer and stop the growth of existing prostate cancer.
  3. Prevented breast cancer from spreading to the lungs in mice.
  4. It may prevent melanoma and cause existing melanoma cells to commit suicide.
  5. Reduces the risk of childhood leukemia.
  6. It's a natural liver detoxifier.
  7. Turmeric may prevent and slow the progression of Alzheimer’s disease by removing amyloyd plaque buildup in the brain.
  8. It may prevent metastases from occurring in many different forms of cancer.
  9. It is a potent natural anti-inflammatory that works as well as many anti-inflammatory drugs but without the side effects.
  10. Has shown promise in slowing the progression of multiple sclerosis in mice.
  11. Is a natural painkiller and cox-2 inhibitor.
  12. May aid in fat metabolism and help in weight management.
  13. Has long been used in Chinese medicine as a treatment for depression.
  14. Because of its anti-inflammatory properties, it is a natural treatment for arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.
  15. Boosts the effects of chemo drug paclitaxel and reduces its side effects.
  16. Promising studies are underway on the effects of turmeric on pancreatic cancer.
  17. Studies are ongoing in the positive effects of turmeric on multiple myeloma.
  18. Has been shown to stop the growth of new blood vessels in tumors.
  19. Speeds up wound healing and assists in remodeling of damaged skin.
  20. May help in the treatment of psoriasis and other inflammatory skin conditions.
  21. Curcumin seems to delay liver damage that can eventually lead to cirrhosis, according to preliminary experimental research at the Medical University Graz in Austria.
  22. Kansas State University research found that adding certain spices, including turmeric, can reduce the levels of heterocyclic amines — carcinogenic compounds that are formed when meats are barbecued, boiled or fried — by up to 40 percent.
  23. Rodent studies at the University of Texas indicate that curcumin inhibits the growth of a skin cancer, melanoma and also slows the spread of breast cancer into the lungs.
  24. Researchers from the University of South Dakota have found that pretreatment with curcumin makes cancer cells more vulnerable to chemo and radiotherapy.
  25. Epidemiologists have hypothesized that the turmeric that is part of daily curries eaten in India may help explain the low rate of Alzheimer’s disease in that country. Among people aged 70 to 79, the rate is less than one-quarter that of the United States. (Source: Dr. Andrew Weil) 
Here's how to use turmeric!
 
1. Spice up your food. 
 
Add this spice to anything, besides sweets, for a new flavor and a ton of health benefits. You can use turmeric to add some zest to cooked vegetables, eggs, and meat dishes. You can also add it to boiling water you're using to make pasta, rice, soups, and more. 
 
2. Drink it as a tea. 
 
Bring four cups of water to a boil. Add one teaspoon of ground turmeric and reduce to a simmer for 10 minutes. Strain the tea through a fine sieve into a cup, add honey and/or lemon to taste.
 
3. Use a turmeric supplement. 
 
I like to take a tumeric supplements a day in case I am traveling and am unable to cook with it.
Here is a great source to purchase organic tumeric from here
 
4. Mix it with castor oil for a skin detox. 
 
Castor oil with tumeric powder is a powerful toxin releaser for your skin. For women, it is great to apply to the breast and under arm because it will pull out harmful toxins from the lymph nodes and fat cells of the breast.

Natural News, obviously, has a lot of articles on turmeric and its benefits. Here's the link to the search I did...

http://www.naturalnews.com/GoogleSearchResults.html?q=turmeric&cx=010579349100583850635%3Aw_kzwe9_yca&cof=FORID%3A11&ie=UTF-8&sa.x=74&sa.y=13&siteurl=naturalnews.com%2F&ref=&ss=1568j666962j7

And here's one of those articles...

http://www.naturalnews.com/040981_curcumin_turmeric_cancer_prevention.html

Turmeric is one of nature's greatest gifts

Friday, June 28, 2013 by: P. Simard


(NaturalNews) Turmeric has enjoyed a great reputation within India for many generations now. Best known as one of the ingredients used in curry dishes, it's also responsible for ballpark mustard's yellow color. It's been utilized for quite some time in Indian and Chinese societies for the anti-inflammatory results it provides when dealing with a wide array of medical conditions. Turmeric also shows great promise when faced with the task of fighting various forms of cancer or other illnesses such as cystic fibrosis.

Turmeric, also known as curcuma longa, naturally grows in the very warm regions of South Asia. It requires a lot of rain and constant temperatures ranging between 20°C and 30°C in order to bloom and prosper. Its main active component is called curcumin, which has a somewhat bitter, peppery taste combined with a mustard smell.
http://www.naturalnews.com/040981_curcumin_turmeric_cancer_prevention.html

Turmeric fights cancer and inflammation

Curcumin's antioxidant properties help contain the free radicals which can damage our cellular DNA if left free to roam. This antioxidant protection is even more evident inside the colon where we see a quick cell turnover, basically more or less every three days. Mutated cancer cells are annihilated which prevents them from spreading to other parts of the body. From a study conducted on mice at the University of Texas, results have led researchers to believe that curcumin enables the body to keep under control the transcription factors within genes which are needed for tumors to appear. The transcription factors may be seen as a main switch and when it's turned off, certain genes involved in the growth and spread of cancer are simply unable to proceed.

Different studies have shown that curcumin's anti-inflammatory effects are at least on par with certain prescription drugs or over-the-counter ones such as Motrin. The main difference to consider is that turmeric doesn't leave toxic products in the body. There are also great reasons to be optimistic based on studies related to inflammatory bowel diseases. Mice that were given curcumin all seemingly had reduced signs of the following: Mucosal ulceration, thickening of the intestinal walls or the emergence of inflammatory cells. Researchers aren't sure how this process occurs but they suspect curcumin hinders the activity of a cellular inflammatory component named NF kappa-B.

Cystic fibrosis is a life threatening disease in which the lungs are assailed with mucus and the pancreas is impaired, thus inhibiting the mechanism through which nutrients are properly digested and absorbed. Researchers have noticed that the mucus develops because of an abnormally shaped protein, itself being the end result of a defective gene. Some tests were made on mice which had the most familiar kind of protein defect, known as DeltaF508. When the mice were given reasonable doses of curcumin, results showed they were capable to correct the protein's deficiencies, as it began looking and operating normally.

Sources for this article include :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Turmeric

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=78

http://www.healthdiaries.com
From: System 1 Nov 2015 06:45
To: ALL3 of 3
From:  Razz (RAZZMAN)  
 To:  ALL
7242.8 
There's even more good news about the benefits of using turmeric for your health. It is amazing how this one natural spice that is used in foods has all these health benefits.

http://www.naturalnews.com/042908_turmeric_skin_health_radiation_damage.html
 
Turmeric improves skin health, protects from UVB radiation damage and aging, concludes Japanese study
 
Thursday, November 14, 2013 by: L.J. Devon, Staff Writer
 
 
(NaturalNews) The Holy Powder of India, turmeric, is spreading its healing influence around the world, blessing the open mind with its plethora of health benefits. (It is a great brain-boosting, mood-enhancing antidepressant). Used extensively in Ayurvedic, Unani and Chinese medicine, turmeric cures hepatic disorders and conditions caused by inflammation in the body. In topical applications, turmeric is supreme, proven to heal skin infections and treat boils efficiently.
 
Bright orange-yellow, turmeric is voluptuous to the eyes; its key component, curcumin glows strong as a natural blood-cleansing, antioxidant, cancer-killing super spice.
 
In all honesty, this bright orange-yellow color should be replacing the pink colors associated with the whole breast cancer awareness advertising malarkey. A study from Zehijian, China, shows that curcumin has the capability to kill triple negative breast cancer cells by inducing programmed cell death (apoptosis). In the US, curcumin-based treatments could replace, and should replace, expensive radiation treatments immediately.
 
In any case, turmeric could be used to protect skin cells from the damaging effects of radiation treatments, which are practically forced onto people who have cancer.
 
 
Study shows how turmeric protects skin from UVB radiation damage
 
A study from Ehime University in Japan suggests that turmeric extract protects skin health from ultraviolet B radiation damage.
 
The researchers examined the effects of long-term, low-dose UVB radiation on melanin-possessing hairless mice. They looked at changes such as skin thickness, elasticity, pigmentation and wrinkling.
 
When they began administering turmeric doses twice daily, they noticed preventative benefits showing up in the skin of the mice. Both dosages of 300 and 1000 mg/kg of turmeric were effective at reducing skin elasticity that was induced by UVB radiation. Both dosages also prevented an increase in skin thickness. The high dosage prevented wrinkle formation and also decreased the diameter and length of skin blood vessels.
 
In the end, the researchers found out that chronic irradiation increases the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 genes. Turmeric, on the other hand, stops that gene's expression in its tracks.
 
Study shows how topical vesicular formulations of turmeric recuperate UV-damaged skin
 
The anti-aging, moisturizing, antioxidant, astringent and antimicrobial properties of turmeric were put to the test in a study from India. Various creams containing Curcuma longa (turmeric) were formulated to study their effect on recuperating UV radiation-damaged skin.
 
What they found out was that the alcoholic Curcuma longa extract was most effective in transfersomal creams. It was found to enhance skin hydration when compared to plain extract-loaded conventional creams. Sebum production was enhanced as well. Sebum, a secretion from the sebaceous glands, acts as a cellular lubricant. By cleansing these glands, turmeric stimulated sebum production, which can keep the skin looking young and unblemished.
 
In conclusion, the herbal extract creams were highly efficacious and, with turmeric extract included, could be used as strong photo protective skin care products in the future.
 
 
Michigan study shows how curcumin works at the cellular level
 
In conjunction with the Japanese and Indian studies, a US study from the University of Michigan shows how curcumin helps regulate cells. By inserting itself inside the cell membranes, curcumin goes to work within the cells, fighting infections and cancers deep within the membranes. This study, spearheaded by Ayyalusamy Ramamoorthy, utilized solid-state NMR spectroscopy to examine atoms, membranes, proteins and compounds. Prior assumption alleged that curcumin acted by interacting with the proteins in the cell membrane, but the new Michigan study shows that the cell membrane undergoes unique changes in the presence of curcumin.
 
Curcumin will be used in future skin care creams to not only protect from radiation damage but also recuperate skin. With its cell-penetrating ability, curcumin can cleanse the body at the most vital level to prevent cancers and protect skin from damage imposed by an irradiated environment.
 
Sources for this article include:
 
http://science.naturalnews.com
 
http://www.naturalnews.com
 
http://dermatologistsblog.com
 
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov

Yet another article on Natural News about the benefits of turmeric and curcumin. This is a more scientifically technical report that goes into the details on how curcumin helps defeat such diseases as high blood pressure and cancer.

http://www.naturalnews.com/043054_curcumin_antioxidant_cancer_treatment.html

The powerful health benefits of curcumin

Tuesday, November 26, 2013 by: Dr. David Jockers


(NaturalNews) The orange Asian herb turmeric has been traditionally used for centuries by Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine. Curcumin is the most powerful active anti-inflammatory compound within turmeric. Curcumin has been shown to be a powerful suppressor of chronic inflammation-mediated disease processes.

Many Asian cultures use turmeric in nearly every meal. They rave of its anti-aging and medicinal benefits. Western medicine has just begun to research its components at a very deep level to better understand turmeric's remarkable health properties. Over 240 studies have appeared in the mainstream literature demonstrating curcumin's cancer-preventive effects.

Curcumin and blood sugar stability:

Curcuminoid polyphenols are the primary antioxidant in turmeric root. Curcumin is the principle curcuminoid, and it is responsible for the majority of health benefits attributed to turmeric. The other curcuminoids include desmethoxycurcumin and bis-desmethoxycurcumin.

Blood sugar imbalances and insulin resistance are huge factors that promote inflammatory conditions in the body. Elevated blood sugar creates hazardous glucose cross-links with proteins, causing Advanced Glycolytic Enzymes (AGEs) to form. These AGEs damage cell membranes, vital enzyme systems and perpetuate inflammatory conditions throughout the body.

Curcumin modulates blood sugar and improves insulin receptor function by improving its binding capacity to sugar. Curcumin activates PPAR (peroxisome proliferator-activator receptor), which is a group of key nuclear proteins that regulate gene expression and modulate sugar uptake and utilization in the bloodstream.

Curcumin also reduces the activity of specific liver enzymes that release sugar into the bloodstream while activating enzymes that store sugar as glycogen. Research on diabetic rats resulted in blood glucose stabilization and lowered triglyceride levels in the group that consumed curcumin.

Curcumin as an antioxidant:

Turmeric is the fourth most antioxidant-rich herb with an Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (ORAC) of 159,277. The curcuminoids boost levels of the body's most potent antioxidants including glutathione, superoxide dismutase and catalase. These molecules are critical for the body to limit oxidative stress-related damage to the vital organ systems.

Curcumin has been shown to reduce inflammation-mediating prostaglandins, cytokines and other molecules such as interleukin 6, nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-kb) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). With a high enough dosage, this has the ability to pull the body out of a strong inflammatory cascade and reset anti-inflammatory behavior at the cellular level.

Curcumin and cancer:

Research done by the Life Extension Foundation found that curcuminoids target ten factors involved in cancer development. This includes chronic inflammation, DNA damage and disruption of cell signaling pathways. Curcumin supplementation was shown to destroy cancer cell mitochondria, disrupt the cancer cell cycle and arrest stem cell development that facilitates further cancer cell formation.

There are hundreds of other studies that have shown that curcumin turns on natural apoptotic (cell suicide) switches in cancer cells. They also reduce inflammatory prostaglandins that promote cancer cell growth. A study out of China showed that curcumin was able to induce apoptosis within triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells. TNBC is a type of cancer that defies conventional chemotherapy and radiation.

Best dosages of curcumin:

For optimal curcumin absorption, it is necessary to combine the turmeric with good fats such as coconut oil, milk or olive oil. You will also want to add a dash of black pepper for the piperine molecule that enhances curcumin uptake. You can also find fermented turmeric in an organic acid base which has an extraordinarily high absorption rate.

For individuals with chronic inflammatory diseases such as cancer, it is recommended to supplement with high-dose curcumin. Find one that is made with piperine in an enteric coating that protects the nutrient from stomach acid for optimal absorption.

An official dosage has not yet been established by the scientific literature. However, studies involving human patients with cancer found that curcumin doses of 3.6 grams or more daily had the best effect.

Curcumin regulates tumor suppressor pathways and triggers mitochondria-mediated death in the cancer tissue. Curcumin is anti-angiogenic, which means that it shuts down the ability of cancer cells to form new blood vessels for blood supply and fuel. This effect makes cancer cells more vulnerable to pharmacological treatments such as chemotherapy and other cancer-control drugs.

Here's another great article about the miracle spice turmeric...

http://www.naturalnews.com/045433_turmeric_fluoride_poisoning_brain_health.html

Turmeric shown to protect brain against fluoride poisoning

Wednesday, June 04, 2014 by: Jonathan Benson, staff writer
Tags: turmeric, fluoride poisoning, brain health


(NaturalNews) The neurodegenerative effects of fluoride are well documented in the scientific literature, and yet this toxic byproduct of industrial manufacturing continues to get dumped into the water supplies of almost every major city in the U.S. without consent. And while it may take a little more time before a critical mass of folks finally wakes up and puts a stop to this mass poisoning of the public, there is a way you and your family can better avoid the toxic effects of fluoride today through proper nutrition.

Publishing their findings in a recent issue of Pharmacognosy Magazine, a research team out of India observed that regular consumption of turmeric, a spice commonly used in Indian and Asian cuisine, helps to protect the mammalian brain against fluoride poisoning. Having previously uncovered the pathways through which fluoride induces harmful neurodegenerative changes in the brain, the team from Mohanlal Sukhadia University found that turmeric both neutralizes existing fluoride and protects against additional fluoride.

Testing the effects of turmeric in mice, the researchers observed that curcumin, the most well-known nutritive compound in turmeric, produces powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity that protects against multiple forms of cell damage, including singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical and superoxide radical damage. Curcumin also helps spur the production of glutathione, the body's "master antioxidant" that studies have shown plays a primary role in guarding against oxidative stress.

Supplementing with turmeric can completely reverse damage caused by fluoride

Knowing that fluoride induces both neurotoxic and neurodegenerative effects on brain tissue, particularly that of the hippocampus and cerebral cortex, the team tested the effects of fluoride alone, fluoride in combination with turmeric, turmeric alone and a control on mice that were randomly divided into each of these four groups. All the mice consumed their respective regimens for 30 days before undergoing analysis.

At the end of the study period, it was observed that mice in the fluoride group, which were given 120 parts per million (ppm) of fluoride in water without curcumin, experienced significant increases in malondialdehyde (MDA) activity -- MDA is a recognized marker of oxidative stress. Mice consuming the same amount of fluoride along with 30 milligrams per kilogram of body weight (mg/kg), however, experienced a marked reduction in MDA, revealing the toxicity-mediating power of turmeric.

"[Fluoride] may cross the blood brain barrier, accumulate in mice hippocampal neuron cell bodies and initiates cascade of reactions which increases the oxidative stress that causes an increase in MDA content of brain tissue, which is an end product of LPO [lipid peroxidation]," wrote the authors.

"On the other hand, a distinctive decrease in MDA level was observed after [curcumin] treatment, compared to group treated with [fluoride]... [because] this phytochemical is capable of quenching oxygen free radicals such as superoxide anions and hydroxyl radicals, which are important for the initiation of LPO."

Fluoride is an 'excitotoxin' like MSG that causes brain neurons to die

Concerning the general toxicity of fluoride, the team is convinced, based on more than a decade of extensive research, that the chemical very clearly collects and accumulates in brain tissue. Similar to the way that monosodium glutamate (MSG) over-excites brain neurons and essentially kills them, fluoride likewise produces an excitotoxic effect that can have lasting health consequences.

"Fluoride (F) is probably the first inorganic ion which drew attention of the scientific world for its toxic effects and now the F toxicity through drinking water is well-recognized as a global problem," explains the study. "Health effect reports on F exposure also include various cancers, adverse reproductive activities, cardiovascular, and neurological diseases."

You can view the curcumin/fluoride study in its entirety here:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.

I have put turmeric in my salsa and have enjoyed that. Here's some other food items you can add it to...

http://blogs.naturalnews.com/amazing-turmeric-six-delicious-ways-enjoy/

Amazing Turmeric: Six Delicious Ways to Enjoy it

By Karen Azeez

Posted Saturday, July 5, 2014 at 10:46am EDT

For those of you who have never tried Turmeric, it’s is the spice that gives curry its yellow color. So if you love curry, you’ll love turmeric. And even if curry’s not your thing, you’ll probably enjoy turmeric’s warm, mild flavor.

Turmeric has been used in India for thousands of years as a spice and medicinal herb. The National Institutes of Health lists 24 current studies on the effects of turmeric and its chief active component, curcumin. Such studies have indicated that turmeric contains compounds, including curcumin, which has powerful anti-inflammatory effects and is a potent antioxidant. Therefore, evidence suggests that this relative of ginger is a promising preventive agent for a wide range of diseases, probably due largely to its anti-inflammatory properties.

For example, turmeric may help prevent various forms of cancer, reduce cholesterol, improve liver function, guard against Alzheimer’s disease, aid in easing inflammatory bowel disease, and even treat depression. Yes, it’s true: new research has found that 1,000 mg daily of curcumin proved to be just as effective at lifting depression as Prozac.

Great! Now the question is…how can we add more turmeric into our meals – and our lives?

Although, turmeric is available in a supplement form for those who want to ensure they are getting enough curcumin, cooking brings out the wonders of this miraculous spice. Because curcumin is fat soluble, it works best incorporated into foods prepared with healthy fats. Studies have also shown that black pepper boosts the absorption of curcumin into the blood stream, so make sure your pepper grinder is close at hand. The following are six easy ways to incorporate turmeric into meals that you and your family and friends will love:

#1 Scrambled Eggs – Sprinkle 2 tsp of turmeric as you mix your raw eggs. Add some salt and pepper. Scramble in a sauté pan with butter. You won’t believe how the turmeric brings out the flavor of the eggs – Yum!

#2 Sauces and Dressings – Turmeric is great in everything from mustard vinaigrette to cashew cream sauce – and, of course, curries!

#3 Chilies and Soups – Turmeric adds a zingy depth and warmth to bean and meat chilis and all kinds of hearty soups. Add a tablespoon or so when you are sautéing your onions and garlic – and don’t forget the pepper!

#4 Roasted Veggies – skip the rosemary and thyme and coat your veggies in some coconut oil, turmeric, and pepper instead.

#5 Stir Fry – instead of sodium-laden soy, try turmeric, sesame oil, apple cider vinegar, onions and garlic and red pepper the next time you bring out your wok.

#6 Tea – Yes, you can add turmeric to your favorite loose teas. Try it with ginger or cinnamon for a warming tea or with mint and lime for a summer pick-me-up. Remember to pair it with a healthy fatty snack or meal for the full benefits.

Of course no food or spice will cure everything that ails you, but as part of a lifestyle that includes a clean diet, exercise, stress-reduction, a daily sprinkle or two of turmeric in your cooking can be a valuable addition to your healthy meals, and a great habit to start today!