Get more olive oil in your diet.

From: System 1 Nov 2015 07:01
To: ALL1 of 2
From:  Razz (RAZZMAN)  
 To:  ALL
10913.1 
For the past 6 years I have been trying to get more olive oil in my diet. After breakfast, I get half a teaspoon of organic peanut butter and fill it with olive oil. I keep this up until the peanut butter is licked off the spoon. Before my dinner, I make a salad and mix virgin olive oil with my salad dressing.

I have read that in order to get the vitamins and supplements that I take to be digested properly, one needs to have natural oils to help the digestive process. Olive oil was my choice. Have always heard that it was probably the best of all the oils to use in cooking. Here's an article that lists the other benefits of introducing olive oil into your diet...

http://www.naturalnews.com/043724_olive_oil_healthy_oils_dietary_fats.html

Understanding the benefits of natural olive oil

Friday, January 31, 2014 by: Sandeep Godiyal
Tags: olive oil, healthy oils, dietary fats


(NaturalNews) Everyone knows that natural and organic foods are far more healthier than their processed counterparts. Unfortunately, many people don't take to heart this valuable piece of information, and they continue to consume food products that are completely unhealthy for them. In doing this, they often develop a wide array of preventable health conditions. The road to getting healthier can begin today, and it can start by incorporating natural olive oil into one's diet. In fact, let's go ahead and take a quick look at five healthy benefits of natural and organic olive oil.

Benefit 1: Good for the heart

Bad cholesterol, medically referred to as LDL, can lead to the development of cardiovascular disease. Because of this, people need to do all that they can to limit the amount of bad cholesterol that develops in their bodies. Natural olive oil has been proven to reduce the amount of arterial plaque that builds on the walls of arteries; therefore, making it a great weapon in the fight against heart disease.

Benefit 2: Boosts iron intake

Organic and natural olive oil tend to have high levels of iron. Iron helps formulate hemoglobin, which is the protein in the body that helps carry oxygen through the bloodstream. Iron also plays a key part in building enzymes that regulate immune functions. Additionally, iron is essential in the overall cognitive development of a person. Basically, the more iron a person has, the healthier he or she will be, and consuming natural olive oil is a great way to boost iron intake.

Benefit 3: Protects against cancer

Cancer is a disease that finds its way into every family. Whether it be colon, breast or skin cancer, almost everyone knows of someone who has died from the disease. Fortunately, consuming natural olive oil will help fight against cancer. How does it serve as protection? Mainly, it's because it contains phenolic antioxidants, terpenoid and squalene, all of which are great weapons against the development of cancer.

Benefit 4: Reduces pain

Because natural olive oil tends to contain high levels of oleocanthal, it works as a strong anti-inflammatory substance, meaning it mimics the properties of ibuprofen. Because of this, natural olive oil is a great natural pain reliever. Whether it be a headache or arthritis pain, many people testify that natural olive oil can reduce the associated pain.

Benefit 5: Protects against ulcer development

Natural olive oil has high levels of antimicrobial properties, which are great at reducing the risk of ulcers in the stomach. In fact, because the oil is packed with polyphenols, these protect against eight different strains of bacteria that are known to cause ulcers. Three of these strains are resistant to antibiotics, making natural olive oil even more effective than some medications.

Tips for buying olive oil

When buying natural olive oil, it's best to buy oil that's packed in dark glass. The darkness of the glass will protect the oil from degrading due to heat and light. Additionally, when purchasing the oil, it's a good idea to purchase certified olive oil; this ensures that the oil itself really is natural.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.chatelaine.com

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/266258.php

http://health.howstuffworks.com

Here is a really detailed article about olive oil and its benefits...

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=132

Digestive Health Benefits

Benefits of olive oil for the digestive tract were first uncovered in research on diet and cancers of the digestive tract. Numerous studies found lower rates of digestive tract cancers—especially cancers of the upper digestive tract, including the stomach and small intestine—in populations that regularly consumed olive oil. Studies on the Mediterranean Diet were an important part of this initial research on olive oil and the digestive tract. Protection of the lower digestive tract (for example, protection of the colon from colon cancer) is less well-documented in the olive oil research, even though there is some strongly supportive evidence from select laboratory animal studies. Many of these anti-cancer effects in the digestive tract were believed to depend on the polyphenols in olive oil and their antioxidant plus anti-inflammatory properties. One particular category of polyphenols, called secoiridoids, continues to be a focus in research on prevention of digestive tract cancers.

Recent research has provided us with even more information, however, about olive oil, its polyphenols, and protection of the digestive tract. One fascinating area of recent research has involved the polyphenols in olive oil and the balance of bacteria in our digestive tract. Numerous polyphenols in olive oil have been shown to slow the growth of unwanted bacteria, including bacteria commonly responsible for digestive tract infections. These polyphenols include oleuropein, hydroxytyrosol, and tyrosol. Some of these same polyphenols—along with other olive oil polyphenols like ligstroside—are specifically able to inhibit the growth of the Helicobacter pylori bacterium. This effect of the olive oil polyphenols may be especially important, since overpopulation of Helicobacter bacteria coupled with over-attachment of Helicobacter to the stomach lining can lead to stomach ulcer and other unwanted digestive problems.

CONTINUED...

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=132

It has been written and said that the vitamins and supplements we take usually all get flushed out of our system before being absorbed and incorporated into our bodies. I did research on this to find a way to help keep the vitamins from being discarded before they do their work. One way was to start taking probiotics. Another way was to incorporate a healthy oil into my diet. Olive oil was the obvious choice. Here's more about the digestive advantages of getting olive oil into your diet...

http://www.internationaloliveoil.org/estaticos/view/95-olive-oil-and-the-digestive-system
    
Olive oil and the digestive system

As soon as we eat olive oil it has a number of effects all the way along the digestive system. As far back as in ancient times it was recommended for assorted digestive disorders, and its beneficial properties are now being corroborated by epidemiological studies and a wealth of scientific data.

OLIVE OIL AND THE STOMACH

When olive oil reaches the stomach it does not reduce the tonus of the muscular ring or sphincter at the base of the oesophagus. Because of this, it reduces the risk of the flow or reflux of food and gastric juice up from the stomach to the oesophagus.

Olive oil also partially inhibits gastric motility. As a result, the gastric content of the stomach is released more slowly and gradually into the duodenum, giving a greater sensation of "fullness", and favouring the digestion and absorption of nutrients in the intestine.


OLIVE OIL AND THE HEPATO-BILIARY SYSTEM

One of the effects of olive oil on the hepato-biliary system is that it is a cholagogue, ensuring optimal bile drainage and full emptying of the gall bladder. Another effect is that it is cholecystokinetic, i.e. it stimulates the contraction of the gall bladder, which is extremely helpful in the treatment and prevention of disorders of the bile ducts. It stimulates the synthesis of bile salts in the liver and it increases the amount of cholesterol excreted by the liver.

In short, owing to its beneficial effect on the muscle tone and activity of the gall bladder, olive oil stimulates the digestion of lipids, because they are emulsified by the bile, and it prevents the onset of gallstones.


OLIVE OIL AND THE PANCREAS

When consumed, olive oil produces a small amount of secretion by the pancreas, making this organ "work" little, but efficiently and enough to carry out all its digestive functions. Olive oil is recommended in diseases where pancreatic function has to be maintained, such as pancreas failure, chronic pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, malabsorption syndromes, etc.


OLIVE OIL AND THE INTESTINES

Owing to the sitosterol it contains, olive oil partially prevents cholesterol absorption by the small intestine. It also stimulates the absorption of various nutrients (calcium, iron, magnesium, etc.).

Olive oil, therefore, is a fat that is digested and absorbed really well. It has choice properties and a mild laxative effect that helps to combat constipation and bad breath.

I found a Mike Adams article from the Natural News that talks about the importance of adding healthy fats to our diet in order to digest the vitamins and supplements we take...

http://www.naturalnews.com/001545_dietary_fat_good_fats.html

Dietary fat is necessary for absorption of vitamins, nutrients and phytochemicals from fruits and vegetables

Wednesday, July 28, 2004
by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger

Editor of NaturalNews.com

A fascinating new study published by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition shows that dietary fat is necessary for the absorption of nutrients from fruits and vegetables. In the study, people who consumed salads with fat-free salad dressing absorbed far less of the helpful phytonutrients and vitamins from spinach, lettuce, tomatoes and carrots than those who consumed their salads with a salad dressing containing fat.

This is interesting research, but not necessarily all that surprising. We've known for a long time that healthy fats are a critical part of a healthy diet, and that avoiding fats actually causes chronic disease. The key is in choosing the right kind of fats for your diet and making sure you don't overdo the fats, because fats have a very high caloric density and can add far more calories to your meal than you might expect.

In this study, the focus was on eating salads with either fat-free salad dressing or regular salad dressing containing fat in the form of canola oil. However, these findings apply to far more than just eating salads. Every meal that you consume should contain healthy fats, even if only in small portions. What are the healthy fats? Canola oil is what I consider a neutral fat, meaning it's not necessarily a bad fat, but neither is it considered one of the healthier fats. The healthy fats include extra-virgin olive oil, flax seed oil, and fats from plant sources such as nuts, seeds, avocados, and coconuts. These healthy fats should be consumed with every meal. Failure to include these fats in a meal will result in many of the nutrients consumed during the meal not being absorbed by the body. That's because many nutrients are fat-soluble nutrients. Beta carotene, Vitamin D, and Vitamin E are three such nutrients that require fat in order to be absorbed and used by the human body, but there are many other nutrients that also need fats for human metabolism.

It doesn't take much fat, by the way, to aid the absorption of these important vitamins and nutrients. Eating just 5 or 10 nuts, or one-fourth of an avocado, provides plenty of dietary fat for transporting these nutrients and aiding their absorption. On another note, it's interesting to remember that for decades the American Heart Association insisted that heart patients should avoid nearly all dietary fat. This was during the low-fat craze of the 1980's and 1990's, when people were running scared from all dietary sources of fat and instead consuming massive quantities of sugar and refined carbohydrates.

We now know that this advice from the American Heart Association was, in effect, causing extreme nutritional deficiencies and actually reducing the life span of heart patients rather than helping them. Such is the case with information from many so-called disease organizations, such as the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association. Personally, I wouldn't listen to nutritional advice from any association that is so politically motivated and receives funding from pharmaceutical companies, as both of those organizations do.

The other thing to keep in mind with this finding is that if you are supplementing your diet with nutritional supplements or superfoods like the ones I frequently recommend, it's a good idea to do so in combination with a few nuts, seeds, or a tablespoon of flax oil or olive oil. One tablespoon of flax oil will give you about 100 calories, so keep that in mind in terms of keeping your total daily calorie intake under control. By consuming fats as you take these nutritional supplements, you will multiply the effectiveness of the phytonutrients found in those supplements, thereby giving your body far greater nutritional help from the very same capsules and pills.

In other words, if you take superfood supplements without fat, you're not getting the same benefit as taking the same supplements with a little bit of fat. So keep some nuts handy, as I always do, and eat a few nuts with each meal. I highly recommend macadamias, cashews, pecans, peanuts, and almonds, and all nuts should be purchased and consumed in their raw form, without absolutely no added salt or flavors, and with no roasting or cooking. Raw nuts are the healthiest way to go, and will provide you with all sorts of additional beneficial nutrients that go beyond what you're getting in your food.

One more bit of advice about all of this -- if you're thinking that you should start eating your salads with salad dressing because of this new research, be sure to double-check the kind of fat that is in your salad dressing. Most of the cheaper salad dressings are made with soybean oil, and there's nothing necessarily wrong with soybean oil, but it is not the healthiest oil you can choose. It is used by the food manufacturing industry primarily because it's cheap -- it's a cheap source of calories, and it tastes the same as any other fat to most people. But canola oil is better than soybean oil, and olive oil is better yet.

You can also count on any salad dressing you find at national restaurant chains or fast food restaurants to be made with the cheapest oils possible, which would include soybean oil and partially hydrogenated oils, which of course, should be avoided at all costs.

The more I read, the more I find that taking olive oil, or maybe coconut oil, is extremely important for those who take vitamins and nutrient supplements in the morning. Here's another article that emphasizes the importance of having healthy oils as part of your diet...

http://health.howstuffworks.com/wellness/food-nutrition/vitamin-supplements/fat-absorb-vitamins.htm

How does dietary fat help us absorb vitamins?

By Julia Layton


With all the low-fat and fat-free products on the market, you'd think reducing fat intake would be the surest way to greater health. In fact, there is such a thing as too little fat.

Strange but true: Eating fat-free can lead to health problems. Specifically, it can lead to vitamin deficiencies. That's because some vitamins require fat to be absorbed into the body and to do their jobs, which include providing energy, keeping cells functioning and supporting the immune system, for a start. Vitamins are essential, which means fats are essential, too.

Dietary fat, which comes from the food you eat, is crucial to the absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins, which includes vitamins A, D, K and E (water-soluble vitamins B and C don't need fat). Vitamin A is essential for good vision, vitamin D for bone health, K for blood clotting, and E for limiting the formation of harmful free radicals.

When fat-soluble vitamins are ingested, they move from the mouth to the stomach to the small intestine. Their ability to dissolve in fat allows for their absorption: Fats are able to move across the cell walls of the small intestine and enter the body's general circulation. Any vitamins dissolved in that fat are absorbed into the body as well. The dietary-fat vehicles carry the vitamins through the intestine, into the bloodstream, and then to the liver, where they're stored until the body needs them.

Without an adequate amount of fat in your diet, your body is unable to effectively absorb the fat-soluble vitamins that are essential to your health. However, that's not a free pass to consume a dozen donuts: The types of fat you eat matter. A lot.

While the fat in donuts will help you absorb your vitamins, it'll also make you overweight and increase your cholesterol. When consuming dietary fat to improve your health, there are some important rules to follow, including:

    Avoid unhealthy fats, including saturated and trans fats. Plant fats are best -- avocado, coconut, nuts and seeds are good sources.

    Stick with the healthy oils, including olive oil and flax seed oil. Soybean and canola are less-healthy choices.

    Don't overdo it -- you only need a small amount of fat to facilitate vitamin absorption. Just consume a little (maybe 5 or 10 nuts, a small handful of sunflower seeds, or a couple of bites of avocado) with any vitamin-rich meal.

So when you take that multivitamin in the morning, pop a few raw almonds in your mouth as a chaser. It'll get those vitamins into position to do some good.
 
From: System 1 Nov 2015 07:02
To: ALL2 of 2
Some more essential facts about olive oil that could save your life..

http://www.explorecrete.com/nature/olive-oil-health-benefits.html

Health Benefits of Olive Oil

The health benefits of olive oil have been recognised by many ancient physicians like Hippocrates, Galen, Dioscorides, and Diocles. In recent years, modern doctors and nutritionists have realised that extra virgin olive oil, particularly, contributes significant nutritional value to human health.

You should not be too surprised if you read that people in the Mediterranean region, where the bulk of olive oil is produced and enthusiastically consumed, have reaped immense health benefits from olive oil.

Olive Oil and Cholesterol

  • Researchers at the University of Minnesota, for one, have discovered that while Greek, Cretan and other Mediterranean men consumed almost as much dietary fat as Americans, they had much lower rates of heart disease. The difference was attributed to the Mediterranean’s consumption of extra virgin olive oil, which is largely monounsaturated fat.
  • Researchers at the Universidad Autonoma de Madrid in Spain found in a study that a diet rich in extra virgin olive oil helped to lower LDL (bad) cholesterol and, perhaps more importantly, stimulated an increase in HDL (good) cholesterol.
  • Researchers at the University of Nijmegen in the Netherlands discovered that simply following a low fat diet reduced total cholesterol but HDL cholesterol also declined; in contrast, a high fat diet based on extra virgin olive oil also reduced total cholesterol but HDL cholesterol actually increased.

This is all very good for those concerned about their cholesterol levels, especially the good HDL cholesterol, and the effects on the human circulatory system.

About Cholesterol

Cholesterol is not a water-soluble substance: it floats around in our bodies, attaching itself to proteins and making them lipoproteins. Two types of cholesterol are formed. LDL or low density lipoproteins, is the so-called “bad” cholesterol; it accumulates in bodily tissues and sticks to artery walls as plaque, causing arteriosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) if left unchecked. The other type is HDL or high density lipoproteins, the “good” cholesterol, which helps prevent artery-clogging deposits. The levels of these two cholesterols are affected by the types of fat that we take in daily.

The structures of different fats are described as saturated, mono-unsaturated, and poly-unsaturated. Saturated fats come primarily from animal meats. They are thought the greatest damage to our health, because they increase levels of LDL resulting in arteriosclerosis.

Poly-unsaturated fats come mainly from vegetables, seeds, nuts, and grains. They lower the body’s overall cholesterol level, but to do so they reduce both LDL and HDL. You may want LDL lowered, but you would want HDL increased.  There are also tests indicating that in higher doses polyunsaturated fats may do more damage than good, increasing the risk of nervous system problems, brain synapse connectivity, gall bladder stones, and perhaps even cancer, unless their action is controlled by antioxidants.

Monounsaturated fats are found in varying amounts in all fats. They lower LDL but promote increases in HDL. Thus, the best oil you can use is that has little saturated and polyunsaturated fats content but has plenty of monounsaturated fats.

Fortunately, such an oil exists: olive oil. In olive oil you find some of the lowest levels of saturated and polyunsaturated fats, averaging only 10 to 15% for saturated and 8 to 9% for polyunsaturated. More significantly, olive oil has by far the highest level of monounsaturated fat among all oils, about 75% to 80%.
Effect of Dietary Fats on Cholesterol Levels
Fat
Found in
State at Room Temperature
Effect on Cholesterol Levels
Monounsaturated
Olives; olive oil, canola oil, peanut oil; cashews, almonds, peanuts, and most other nuts; avocados
Liquid
Lowers LDL; raises HDL
Polyunsaturated
Corn, soybean, safflower, and cottonseed oils; fish
Liquid
Lowers both LDL and HDL
Saturated
Whole milk, butter, cheese, and ice cream; red meat; chocolate; coconut milk, and coconut oil
Solid
Raises both LDL and HDL
Trans
Most margarines; vegetable shortening; partially hydrogenated vegetable oil; deep-fried chips; many fast foods; most commercial baked goods
Solid or
semi-solid

Raises LDL; lowers HDL

 

Olive Oil and Rheumatoid Arthritis

A study in Greece showed that people who had the lowest lifetime consumption of extra virgin olive oil had two and a half times greater probability of developing rheumatoid arthritis than those with the highest lifetime consumption. If you know somebody who suffers from rheumatoid arthritis, you must be familiar with the pain and inconvenience it can cause. A rheumatologist of the Arthritis Foundation, which did the research, cites that adding olive oil to your diet could help you protect yourself against rheumatoid arthritis. And, the spokesperson added, since the type of oil consumed in Greece is extra virgin olive oil, that offers additional protection.

Olive Oil and Antioxidants

Among the major components of extra virgin olive oil are antioxidants. Olive oil provides beta carotene (pro-vitamin A) and tocopherol (vitamin E) which are excellent buffers of acids produced in the gastrointestinal tract and those resulting from body metabolism. Extra virgin olive oil contains 88% of its vitamin E in the form of alpha-tocopherol, which is easily synthesised by the body. These are very important antioxidants that prevent the oxidation of LDLs. Such oxidation can cause damage to ordinary cells, nerve cells and arteries and lead to arteriosclerosis, coronary heart disease, or even cancer.

Olive oil has also exhibited specific properties that cause it to be a natural blood thinner. This is good news for those looking to explore natural alternatives to prescription blood thinners. Lately, the topic of blood thinners has encountered some scrutiny; especially after DrugNews.net announced the pradaxa gastrointestinal bleeding occurrences that kept popping up. These recent mishaps have caused a lot of attention to be diverted to natural blood thinning alternatives such as garlic, ginger, whole grains, and yes, olive oil.

Olive Oil and Aging

Medical studies have indicated that diets which are deficient in vitamin E accelerate the breakdown of certain fatty acids, a process which invariably leads to aging. The vitamin E content in olive oil is thought to provide a defence against such effects, and thus help maintain mental faculties and muscular control longer and better. Among other benefits, the vitamin A helps prevent and minimise the development of skin wrinkles.

As we get older, our digestive capacity becomes markedly reduced resulting in more difficulty to absorb nutrients from food, especially vitamins and minerals. Olive oil is very digestible and its nutrients are easier to digest. It also has beneficent effects in aiding digestion and stimulating the appetite.

Another problem associated with aging – bone calcification – can be rectified by olive oil consumption. Studies have shown that a diet containing enough oleates as well as a moderate supply of essential fatty acids is needed for healthy bone mineralisation – a process that aids the developing bones in children and prevents calcium loss in adults.

Olive Oil, good for every body function

Olive oil is nature’s storehouse of many healthful nutrients like vitamins A, E, D and K. Other nutrients found in olive oil are:

  • Magnesium-rich chlorophyll encourages formation of healthy red blood cells.
  • Squalene, a precursor to phytoesterols, helps reduce acidity.
  • Phytoesterols (in the form of beta-sitosterol) assists in preventing cholesterol absorption.
  • Caffeic and gallic nutrients stimulate the flow of bile which helps alkalise food coming out of the stomach, reducing stress on the pancreas.
  • Phenolic compounds protect against fermentation of fats and cholesterol, and may promote higher production of fat-digesting enzymes in the pancreas.
  • Cycloartenol lowers the amount of cholesterol in free circulation and increases excretion of bile to mop up excess acidity and increase alkalinity of the food coming out of the stomach.

 Olive Oil has been shown to have beneficial effects on virtually every aspect of body function, development and maintenance, including brain development, bone structure, digestion, aging process, the condition of skin and hair, metabolism, and on plaque formation in the blood vessels.

There is so much scientific evidence now that establishes the health benefits of olive oil. You will be hard put to find any other food that has so many positive effects on so many different parts of the body and their functions.

These health benefits can be derived from all forms of olive oil; however, refined oils undergo a lot of high temperatures during processing which destroys or alters the antioxidants, and thus have very little, if any, vitamins left. In order to gain the maximum medicinal benefit, you should use only Extra Virgin olive oil.