Eating dandelions is very healthy!

From: Razz (RAZZMAN)10 Jan 2016 10:05
To: ALL1 of 14
Yuck! That must be the first reaction that most people would have if they read the title of this tread. Eating a weed???

I have heard of making dandelion wine, a friend used to do that. And I may have heard about possibly having dandelion greens in a salad. But never did I realize how healthy eating dandelions, from flower to the root, can be very beneficial to one's health.

I read in a health newsletter about how eating dandelion greens could help kidney stones:
 
quote:
Dandelion is most commonly used as a liver and kidney "tonic" to dissolve stones and increse bile flow. It is also employed as a diuretic to reduce water retention and to stimulate appetite. The root and leaves can be eaten in salads or as a cooked green.


That made me curious as I have a lawn full of dandelions just waiting to be sprayed with weed killer. I went out and picked a leaf and muched on it. It was pretty bitter. But I went ahead and harvested some and had them with my salad. No, I didn't die. LOL

Anyway, I did some research on eating dandelions and found out the best time to harvest them is in the early spring BEFORE the flowers come out. That's like stevia. Once the flower blossoms, the leaf is much more bitter.

One interesting fact I leared is that the dandelion has more vitamin A and C than most foods. It also has calcium, so this is definitey a healthy food to eat. And who'd have thunk that??

http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles/williamsc44.html

The dandelion is a healthful, great tasting weed you can eat

By Carol Williams


Want to eat a weed? One that’s easy to find and tastes great? Just start hunting for those first spring dandelions.

The dandelion’s true name is Taraxacum Officinale, which means “the official remedy for disorders.”

Legend has it that the people of Atlantis used the dandelion as a food and a tonic. The early colonists brought the dandelion to America from Europe. They used all parts of the plant, even the roots, which they roasted and ground for a coffee-like drink. We know that frontier healers often recommended dandelion greens as a spring tonic. They are full of vitamins unavailable to pioneers during the winter. There is no doubt dandelions have saved lives.

Our name for the weed comes from the French Dent de Lion, meaning “lion’s tooth.” This refers to the jagged points on the leaves, which look like sharp teeth. The French grow dandelions to eat, just as we grow lettuce in our gardens.

Modern science has analyzed dandelion greens. They are a good source of calcium, potassium, vitamin A, and vitamin C. They have twice as much vitamin A in a one-cup serving than most vitamin pills. They also have as much calcium as a children’s vitamin or half a glass of milk. That’s more than most other vegetables. Without vitamin A, people have eye problems and have trouble fighting infections. Vitamin A helps kids grow tall and keeps skin healthy. Calcium keeps bones strong and growing and nerves working right.

Your parents might have heard of eating dandelions, but even your grandparents might not know how to prepare them. The first steps are knowing when and where to gather the tasty greens. Dandelions are best picked where the grass grows tall and free. Yard dandelions, which have been cut often, do not have as good a flavor. Also, many people try to poison the dandelions in their yards, and those chemicals are not healthy to eat. The best time to gather is long before the last frost of spring.

The first edible portion appears as a slightly reddish tangle of leaves. The greens grow from these. Dandelion greens are the leaves above the surface. They must be gathered before the plant blooms to be delicious. The best time to gather them is just when the bloom bud appears, before the stalk grows. If you wait too long, they will taste bitter. Eating the leaves after the yellow flowers bloom is like chewing yesterday’s gum.

To cook dandelion greens, wash them well with water, then place them in a pan and pour boiling water over them. Let them boil for five minutes, then season with salt and butter. Eat them hot. If the taste is too strong, gather the bloom buds and cook them with the leaves to smooth out the taste. This spring, cook up a batch of nutritious, delicious greens for dinner. And you may want to invite your grandma . . . it could bring back some memories for her.
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)10 Jan 2016 10:06
To: ALL2 of 14
I found another interesting web page that describes the health benefits of eating dandelion. The root really has some great curing powers!


http://www.helium.com/items/1416101-the-benefits-of-eating-dandelions

The benefits of eating dandelions

by Angela Pollock


The dandelion is commonly referred to as a weed in North America and many individuals spend valuable time and money trying to rid them from their yards. The plant grows wild in most regions of the world and is regularly cultivated as a food source and as an herb in countries like China and Germany. Young, tender leaves add flavor to salads and in China, the leaves are used for medicinal teas.

The roots of older plants are harvested for the inulin, a complex carbohydrate used in tinctures as a blood purifier to remove toxins. For hundreds of years the roots have been used as a treatment for jaundice. But dandelions are most notable for being a potent diuretic. For bladder infections, dandelion can prevent urine retention while providing the body with potassium. Some traditional diuretics are known to decrease this vital nutrient that the body needs.

Consuming dandelion can act as a natural laxative and enhances digestion. These benefits are used to aid in weight-loss and dandelion tinctures are commonly prescribed by European herbalists to improve the metabolism. Studies conducted in Bulgaria concluded that dandelion helps those who suffer from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by decreasing irregularity and relieving the pain caused from the disease.

The dandelion root is known to cleanse and stimulate the liver. This effect can help eleviate or prevent certain ailments such as constipation, hemorrhoids, and indigestion. The cleansing of the liver can reduce the chances of developing gallstones but those who already have gallstones are advised not to consume dandelion.

Many cultures have used dandelion for a variety of health ailments. The high levels of potassium and the rich source of iron can help treat anemia. Compared to carrots in equal amounts, dandelion has more carotene which is important for the immune system. Dandelion also provides the body with folic acid, calcium, and vitamin B12. The rich source of boron along with the calcium can help strengthen the bones which in turn can help prevent osteoporosis.

There are precautions that should be taken by those who have existing gallstones and individuals who are taking prescribed diuretics. People with ulcers should avoid dandelion due to the increase in stomach acid that this plant induces. If taking antibiotics, avoid dandelion as it can decrease the effectiveness of certain antibiotics. Before using dandelion as an herbal remedy or consuming on a regular basis, individuals should speak to their health care provider for expert advice as this plant like many others can interact with prescribed medications.

References:

PRESCRI PTION FOR HERBAL HEALING, by Phyllis A. Balch, copyright 2002
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)10 Jan 2016 10:07
To: ALL3 of 14
So before you spray your lawn to make it look beautiful, step back and look at the nature cure that nature has grown in your own yard! The dandelion "weed" cure be the cure that ails you!

http://lifestyle.iloveindia.com/lounge/benefits-of-dandelion-7288.html
 
Benefits Of Dandelion


Dandelion, with the botanical name Taraxacum officinale, is a perennial herb and a genus of flowering plants that belong to the family of Asteraceae. Native to Europe and Asia, the herb in actual is a pesky weed that possesses bright yellow flowers and spatula- like shiny and hairless leaves.

Almost every part of the plant can be consumed like leaves, roots and flowers for its various properties. The plant is often regarded as an annoying weed but is of great value for its healing properties in preventing diseases and various health benefits. It is rich in various nutrients required by the body for proper functioning like dietary fiber, vitamin A, beta carotene, vitamin C, calcium, potassium and vitamin K. Read on to know more about the health benefits of dandelion and explore its nutritional value as well.

Nutritional Value Of Dandelion

Amount of Dandelion:55 g (1 cup, chopped)

Nutrients / Amount
Water 47.1 g
Ash 1 g
Protein 1.5 g
Fats
Total Fat 0.4 g
Saturated Fat 0.1 g
Polyunsaturated Fat 0.2 g
Calories
Total Calories 103 KJ
From Carbohydrate 74.9 KJ
From Fat 13.4 KJ
From Protein 15.1 KJ
Fatty Acids
Omega-3 Fatty Acids 24.2 mg
Omega-6 Fatty Acids 144 mg
Carbohydrates
Total Carbohydrate 5.1 g
Dietary Fiber 1.9 g
Sugars 0.4 g
Vitamins
Vitamin A IU 5588 IU
Vitamin A (retinol activity equiv) 279 mcg
Beta Carotene 3220 mcg
Alpha Carotene 200 mcg
Lutein+Zeaxanthin 7485 mcg
Thiamine 0.1 mg
Riboflavin 0.1 mg
Vitamin C 19.3 mg
Niacin 0.4 mg
Vitamin B6 0.1 mg
Folate 14.9 mcg
Food Folate 14.9 mcg
Dietary Folate Equivalents 14.9 mcg
Choline 19.4 mg
Vitamin K 428 mcg
Vitamin E (Alpha Tocopherol) 1.9 mg
Minerals
Calcium 103 mg
Iron 107 mg
Magnesium 19.8 mg
Phosphorus 36.3 mg
Potassium 218 mg
Zinc 0.2 mg
Copper 0.1 mg
Sodium 41.8 mg
Selenium 0.3 mcg



Nutritional & Health Benefits Of Eating Dandelion
The good amount of calcium present in dandelion is necessary for the growth of strong bones.

Dandelion is rich in antioxidants like vitamin C and luteolin that protects the bone from age related damages, removes toxicity and free radicals and weakening of bones. In addition, it promotes digestion and stimulates liver thereby preventing gallstones.

Dandelion is diuretic in nature and hence it aids in cleaning toxic substances in kidneys and acts as disinfectant thereby preventing microbial growth in the urinary system.
The root of the dandelion plant is probiotic in nature that helps in the healthy functioning of natural bacteria present in gastrointestinal tract.

Dandelion is an excellent source of beta carotene that helps to produce vitamin A in the body.

It has good amount of potassium present in it that helps the body to recover potassium that is lost during urination.

The juice of dandelion is extremely nutritional as it is rich in vitamin E, calcium, iron, vitamin C and potassium.

It is a good source of iron required by the body and hence prevents anemia.

It is good for skin as it helps in its cleansing and treats acne effectively.

Caution
Always look for organically grown dandelion over the ones that are sprayed with chemicals and pesticides as they can be toxic.

People using dandelion for health conditions like gallbladder and gallstones should consult a doctor as it can lead to cleansing and detoxifying reactions.

Dandelion has diuretic properties hence the juice extracted from the plant can provoke health conditions like increased urination, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting and stomach pain.
Individuals suffering from diabetes should strictly prohibit consuming dandelion in any form as it can increase the blood sugar levels and reduce the effects of pharmaceutical drugs.
Allergic reactions have been reported merely by touching the herb hence a caution should be taken by the individuals.
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)10 Jan 2016 10:07
To: ALL4 of 14
And I just bought a new lawn sprayer! After reading this article, I may just take it back and just grow dandelions in my garden instead of tomatoes and carrots! LOL

Check out this article for even more evidence that the dandelion should be considered the "miracle herb" that can cure many diseases...

http://www.leaflady.org/health_benefits_of_dandelions.htm

Health Benefits of Dandelions

By Peter Gail



Suppose your doctor tells you, on your next visit, that he has just discovered a miracle drug which, when eaten as a part of your daily diet or taken as a beverage, could, depending on the peculiarities of your body chemistry:

prevent or cure liver diseases, such as hepatitis or jaundice;

act as a tonic and gentle diuretic to purify your blood, cleanse your system, dissolve kidney stones, and otherwise improve gastro-intestinal health;

assist in weight reduction;

cleanse your skin and eliminate acne;

improve your bowel function, working equally well to relieve both constipation and diarrhea;

prevent or lower high blood pressure;

prevent or cure anemia;

lower your serum cholesterol by as much as half;

eliminate or drastically reduce acid indigestion and gas buildup by cutting the heaviness of fatty foods;

prevent or cure various forms of cancer;

prevent or control diabetes mellitus;

and, at the same time, have no negative side effects and selectively act on only what ails you. If he gave you a prescription for this miracle medicine, would you use it religiously at first to solve whatever the problem is and then consistently for preventative body maintenance?

All the above curative functions, and more, have been attributed to one plant known to everyone, Taraxacum officinale, which means the "Official Remedy for Disorders." We call it the common dandelion. It is so well respected, in fact, that it appears in the U.S. National Formulatory, and in the Pharmacopeias of Hungary, Poland, Switzerland, and the Soviet Union. It is one of the top 6 herbs in the Chinese herbal medicine chest.

According to the USDA Bulletin #8, "Composition of Foods" (Haytowitz and Matthews 1984), dandelions rank in the top 4 green vegetables in overall nutritional value. Minnich, in "Gardening for Better Nutrition" ranks them, out of all vegetables, including grains, seeds and greens, as tied for 9th best. According to these data, dandelions are nature's richest green vegetable source of beta-carotene, from which Vitamin A is created, and the third richest source of Vitamin A of all foods, after cod-liver oil and beef liver! They also are particularly rich in fiber, potassium, iron, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and the B vitamins, thiamine and riboflavin, and are a good source of protein.

These figures represent only those published by the USDA. Studies in Russia and Eastern Europe by Gerasimova, Racz, Vogel, and Marei (Hobbs 1985) indicate that dandelion is also rich in micronutrients such as copper, cobalt, zinc, boron, and molybdenum, as well as Vitamin D.

Much of what dandelions purportedly do in promoting good health could result from nutritional richness alone. Vogel considers the sodium in dandelions important in reducing inflammations of the liver. Gerasimova, the Russian chemist who analyzed the dandelion for, among other things, trace minerals, stated that "dandelion [is] an example of a harmonious combination of trace elements, vitamins and other biologically active substances in ratios optimal for a human organism" (Hobbs 1985).

Recent research, reported in the Natural Healing and Nutritional Annual, 1989 (Bricklin and Ferguson 1989) on the value of vitamins and minerals indicates that:

* Vitamin A is important in fighting cancers of epithelial tissue, including mouth and lung;

* Potassium rich foods, in adequate quantities, and particularly in balance with magnesium, helps keep blood pressure down and reduces risks of strokes;

* Fiber fights diabetes, lowers cholesterol, reduces cancer and heart disease

risks, and assists in weight loss. High fiber vegetables take up lots of room, are low in calories, and slow down digestion so the food stays in the stomach longer and you feel full longer;

* Calcium in high concentrations can build strong bones and can lower blood pressure;

* B vitamins help reduce stress.

Throughout history, dandelions have had a reputation as being effective in promoting weight loss and laboratory research indicates that there is some support for this reputation. Controlled tests on laboratory mice and rats by the same Romanians indicated that a loss of up to 30% of body weight in 30 days was possible when the animals were fed dandelion extract with their food. Those on grass extract lost much less. The control group on plain water actually gained weight.

Beyond nutritional richness, however, are the active chemical constituents contained in dandelions which may have specific therapeutic effects on the body. These include, as reported by Hobbs (1985):

* Inulin, which converts to fructose in the presence of cold or hydrochloric acid in the stomach. Fructose forms glycogen in the liver without requiring insulin, resulting in a slower blood sugar rise, which makes it good for diabetics and hypoglycemics;

* Tof-CFr, a glucose polymer similar to lentinan, which Japanese researchers have found to act against cancer cells in laboratory mice; Lentinan is a yeast glucan (glucose polymer) that increases resistance against protozoal and viral infections.;

* Pectin, which is anti-diarrheal and also forms ionic complexes with metal ions, which probably contributes to dandelion's reputation as a blood and gastrointestinal detoxifying herb. Pectin is prescribed regularly in Russia to remove heavy metals and radioactive elements from body tissues. Pectin can also lower cholesterol and, combined with Vitamin C, can lower it even more. Dandelion is a good source of both Pectin and Vitamin C;

* Coumestrol, an estrogen mimic which possibly is responsible, at least in part, for stimulating milk flow and altering hormones;

* Apigenin and Luteolin, two flavonoid glycosides which have been demonstrated to have diuretic, anti-spasmodic, anti-oxidant and liver protecting actions and properties, and also to strengthen the heart and blood vessels. They also have anti-bacterial and anti-hypoglycemic properties, and, as estrogen mimics, may also stimulate milk production and alter hormones;

* Gallic Acid, which is anti-diarrheal and anti-bacterial;

* Linoleic and Linolenic Acid, which are essential fatty acids required by the body to produce prostaglandin which regulate blood pressure and such body processes as immune responses which suppress inflammation. These fatty acids can lower chronic inflammation, such as proliferative arthritis, regulate blood pressure and the menstrual cycle, and prevent platelet aggregation;

* Choline, which has been shown to help improve memory;

*Several Sesquiterpene compounds which are what make dandelions bitter. These may partly account for dandelions tonic effects on digestion, liver, spleen and gall bladder, and are highly anti-fungal;

* Several Triterpenes, which may contribute to bile or liver stimulation;

* Taraxasterol, which may contribute to liver and gall bladder health or to hormone altering.

These chemicals, individually, are not unique to dandelions, but the combination of them all in one plant, along with high levels of vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, proteins and fiber account for the many claims made regarding the plant.

These claims include the following results of clinical and laboratory research, again as reported in Hobbs (1985):

* A doubling of bile output with leaf extracts, and a quadrupling of bile output with root extract. Bile assists with the emulsification, digestion and absorption of fats, in alkalinizing the intestines and in the prevention of putrefaction. This could explain the effectiveness of dandelion in reducing the effects of fatty foods (heartburn and acid indigestion);

* A reduction in serum cholesterol and urine bilirubin levels by as much as half in humans with severe liver imbalances has been demonstrated by Italian researchers;

* Diuretic effects with a strength approaching that of the potent diuretics Furosemide and Lasix, used for congestive heart failure and cirrhosis of the liver, with none of the serious side effects, were found by Romanian scientists. They found that water extract of dandelion leaves, administered orally, because of its high potassium content, replaced serum potassium electrolytes lost in the urine, eliminating such side effects common with the synthetics as severe potassium depletion, hepatic coma in liver patients, circulatory collapse, and transmission through mothers' milk;

* In 1979 a Japanese patent was filed for a freeze-dried warm water extract of dandelion root for anti-tumor use. It was found that administration of the extract markedly inhibited growth of particular carcinoma cells within one week after treatment;

* Dental researchers at Indiana University in 1982 used dandelion extracts in antiplaque preparations;

* In studies from 1941 to 1952, the French scientist Henri Leclerc demonstrated the effectiveness of dandelion on chronic liver problems related to bile stones. He found that roots gathered in late summer to fall, when they are rich in bitter, white milky latex, should be used for all liver treatments;

* In 1956, Chauvin demonstrated the antibacterial effects of dandelion pollen, which may validate the centuries old use of dandelion flowers in Korean folk medicine to prevent furuncles (boils, skin infections), tuberculosis, and edema and promote blood circulation.

Also, Witt (1983) recommends dandelion tea to alleviate the water buildup in PMS (pre-menstrual syndrome).

There are many testimonials from those who have benefited from the use of dandelions in the treatment of what ailed them.

Robert Stickle, an internationally famous architect, was diagnosed as having a malignant melanoma 21 years ago, and was given, after radical surgery had not halted its spread, less than 2 years to live. He said, in a letter to Jeff Zullo, president of the Society for the Promotion of Dandelions, (June 23, 1986):

" I went on a search for the answer to my mortal problem, and [discovered] that perhaps it was a nutritional dilemma.... To me, cancer is primarily a liver failure manifestation. {Italians are very concerned about problems of the 'fegato']. [I discovered that] the cancer rate in native Italians is very low among the farming population (paesanos). When they get affluent and move to the city, its the same as the rest of civilized man. Paesanos eat dandelions, make brew from the roots, and are healthy, often living to over 100 years."

He states that he began eating dandelion salad every day, and his improvement confounded the doctors. When he wrote the letter in 1986, 18 years had passed and there had been no recurrence of the melanoma.

A benefit which comes from writing articles for national media is that you hear from people who have interesting stories to tell. I recently received a call from Peter Gruchawka, a 70 year old gentleman from Manorville, NY, who reported that he had been diagnosed with diabetes melitis 3 months before and was put on 5 grams of Micronase. At the time, he had a 5+ sugar spillover in his urine. He took Micronase for about a month before he learned, from his wife who is a nurse, that Micronase can do damage to the liver. He had read in "Herbal Medicine" by Diane Buchanan and "Back to Eden" by Jethro Kloss about the effectiveness of dandelions in controlling diabetes. Without saying anything to his doctors, he stopped taking Micronase and began drinking dandelion coffee each day. During the first week, his urinary sugar, measured night and morning, was erratic and unstable, but after a week, his sugar stabilized and when he called, he had been getting negative urine sugar readings for over a month. The doctors are amazed and can't explain it. An interesting side benefit to replacing Micronase with dandelion coffee is that, while Micronase damages the liver as a side effect, dandelions are particularly known for strengthening the liver.

According to Mr. Gruchawka, he changed nothing but the medication. He had cut out pastries and other sugars when he was diagnosed and started on Micronase, and has continued to do without those things while taking dandelion coffee.

In reporting these claims, however, I must add three qualifiers:

1. First, unfortunately, neither herbs nor synthetic remedies work for everyone in the same way. Different bodies respond differently to medicines, and what works incredibly well for one person may not work at all, or work less well, for someone else.

2. Second, good health results from a combination of healthy diet and enough exercise to keep the body toned. Bob Stickle, for all his insistence that dandelions cured him, changed, according to a mutual friend, his entire lifestyle. He didn't just add dandelion salad to what he was already doing.

3. People with health problems need to seek the advice and care of a competent physician, with whom this information can be shared. It is important to reemphasize that it is presented as information only. I am not a medical doctor, and neither advocate nor prescribe dandelions or dandelion products for use by anyone or for any ailment. Only your doctor can do that.

Because there are so many variables, it is hard to attribute Mr. Stickle's cure to any one of them directly. Likewise, Italian farmers live a lifestyle which combines a healthy diet, lots of work and clean air. They heat and cook with wood, which they have to cut and split. They haul water for household use. When they move to the city, diet, exercise, and environmental conditions change. Stress and sedentary habits increase.

And there is the importance of faith in the healing process, whether it be faith in God or faith in the curative properties of the herb being taken.

While dandelions, given all these variables, may never be proved to cure any specific ill, they are an extremely healthy green which cannot in any way hurt you. Research on how much you would have to eat to cause harm indicates that eating grass is more dangerous than eating dandelions (Hobbs 1985). Therefore, with everything going for dandelions, it is highly probable that everyone can derive at least some nutritional benefit from them by eating or drinking them regularly.

The medical and pharmacological establishment is generally critical of claims regarding the use of herbs on disease, and their concerns need to be put in perspective.

Herbal medicines have been used very effectively far longer than synthetics, and many current pharmaceutical products have been derived from research on plants used as medicine by many cultures. The problem with plants, however, is that they are available to anyone. It is impossible to patent a plant, and thereby gain proprietary rights to it. As a consequence, pharmaceutical companies attempt to isolate the active properties from medicinal plants and synthesize them so that they can patent them. Many of the synthetics have serious side-effects which were not present in the natural plant product, often because other chemicals in the plant offset them (i.e. the large quantities of potassium in dandelions which allows for potassium replenishment when dandelion is used as a diuretic).

USDA botanist Dr. James Duke (1989) suggests that a proper and appropriate "herbal soup", filled with "vitamins, minerals, fibers and a whole host of bioactive compounds," from which the body can selectively strain the compounds it needs to restore itself to health, will be more effective than synthetic medicines containing a "very select and specialized compound or two plus filler, usually non-nutritive." This is especially true if the "herbal soup", in the form of a potent potherb like dandelion, is a regular part of the diet so that the appropriate bioactive substances are present in the right amounts when the body needs them.

The book that this reprint was taken from "The Dandelion Celebration-The Guide to Unexpected Cuisine" is recommended to anyone who would like to know more about this remarkable plant. It covers everything you could want to know about dandelions and more, including recipes, planting, picking and preparing, along with the wonderful history of this "Official Remedy for Disorders", Taraxacum officinale, the common dandelion.
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)10 Jan 2016 10:08
To: ALL5 of 14
It is hard to believe that the dandelion leaf has more nutrients than a carrot! There is so much packed into the leaf and root of the dandelion, that I am surprised it isn't touted as one of the prime healthful herbs.

Nutritional information of dandelions

http://www.nutritiondata.com/facts/vegetables-and-vegetable-products/2441/2


http://www.elook.org/nutrition/vegetables/2410.html

http://www.naturalherbsguide.com/dandelion.html
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)10 Jan 2016 10:08
To: ALL6 of 14
The more I read about the dandelion and all the nutritional benefits, the more I am ready to start havesting my entire yard for this miracle superfood.

http://www.wellwire.com/food/superfoods-food/superfood-of-the-week-dandelion

Superfood of the Week: Dandelion Greens

Superfoods | Dr. Nishant Rao | December 7, 2009 at 6:51 am


Dandelions! Loved by children and hated by meticulous gardeners, this weed has a new fan group: cooks. Have you noticed dandelion leaves in your produce section or on the menu at your favorite restaurant? This incredibly nutritional plant is definitely making a comeback. Here’s why you should cook some for dinner tonight!

The leaves and roots of the dandelion (Taraxacum officinalis) have been used medicinally for centuries to treat liver, gallbladder, kidney problems, joint problems, weak digestion and constipation.

These days the dandelion root is used to stimulate and cleanse the liver and aid with gastrointestinal conditions, skin conditions and detoxification. The dandelion leaf is a diuretic, so much so that the French word for it is pissenlit which translates directly to “piss in the bed.” The leaves are high in potassium, making them the only naturally occurring potassium-sparing diuretic. They are a natural anti-inflammatory used for edema, joint inflammation, urinary and kidney conditions.

In the kitchen, dandelion leaves have a pleasantly bitter flavor and can be a great addition to a stir fry, soup, raw or cooked salad. This slight bitterness is great for digestion as it stimulates the release of more digestive juices. As a food, dandelion leaves are one of the most nutrient-dense greens around. They are higher in beta-carotene than carrots, have a higher iron content than spinach, and are very rich in calcium, vitamin K, vitamin C, B vitamins, potassium, and manganese.

If you don’t see them in your grocery store, forage for your own! The trick to getting leaves that are not too bitter is to make sure you find the young plants before the flowers appear during early spring. The second season starts after the first frost (that’s now!). Of course, make sure not to harvest near roads or places that herbicides have been sprayed and beware of dandelion look-a-likes. Other weeds that can easily be mistaken for dandelions, so look for pointed leaves, only one flower on each stalk (rather than multiple flowers branching off one stalk), hollow stems with milky latex and no hairs on the plant. Uncertain foragers, go to the farmers’ market or your local grocery store!
 
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)10 Jan 2016 10:09
To: ALL7 of 14
Dandelion tea is supposed to be very beneficial for you, especially if you have kidney stones. This is an article that tells you how to prepare the leaves for making the tea...

http://www.teainfusion.com/types/dandelion-tea.html

Dandelion Tea

Dandelion tea is tea made from the leaves of the dandelion plant. The dandelion plant is a thick, brittle, beige and branching plant with milky sap. The name "dandelion" comes from its seed heads, which are white and are reminiscent of a lion's mane.

Dandelion tea is said to have several health benefits, including improving liver function, removing gall stones and reduces the inflammation of the bile duct.

Dandelion tea has a strong, intense and bitter taste and therefore is usually sweetened before being drunk.

Health benefits of dandelion tea
Dandelion tea uses the leaves of the dandelion plant, and the leaves are highly nutritious.

The leaves contain several vitamins and minerals to promote well-being. Dandelion leaves contains more beta-carotene than carrots, which is important for improving a person's ability to see in dim light. The leaves contain iron, calcium, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium and zinc, as well as vitamins B-1, B-2, B-5, B-6, B-12, C, D, E, and P.

Due to the existence of vitamin E, dandelion tea can be used to alleviate skin complaints. Vitamin E can help encourage the growth of body issue and protects cells from damage, therefore promoting healing and reducing scarring.

Preparation of dandelion tea
The best time to harvest the leaves to make dandelion tea is spring, before the flowers appear. Another time is late fall, as after a frost their protective bitterness disappears.

The best plants to use for dandelion tea are young plants with broad leaves, growing in rich, moist soil.

Six dandelion leaves should be used for one cup of tea. The leaves should be torn into strips first, before being placed onto the bottom of the cup. Boiling water should then be poured into the cup, and the tea should be left to stand for 5-10 minutes.

After standing, the tea should be strained before drinking. For a sweeter tasting tea, add one teaspoon of honey or sugar.

Unsweetened dandelion tea may be cooled and applied as a skin wash. The skin wash can be used on minor scars and inflammations.
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)10 Jan 2016 10:09
To: ALL8 of 14
I have eaten dandelion leaf in salads and it isn't half bad. I have not tried the root yet, and will try that in the future. Checked on how to harvest the root and how it is dried and roasted. Here's from one site:

http://www.ehow.com/how_5017947_harvest-dandelion-root.html

How to Harvest Dandelion Root

By Heather Schulte, eHow Member


You decided to harvest dandelion root, but it seems like a challenge to retrieve the precious dandelion root from the hard ground. You don't need a shovel. Follow the steps below and you will have plenty of dandelion roots for making tea or coffee. Dandelion root coffee and tea have been used throughout history to treat health problems including detoxification of the kidneys, swelling, skin problems, digestive discomfort, fever, vision problems, and diabetes. Dandelion root is a natural diuretic.

Moderately EasyInstructions.

1-The best time of the year to forage for dandelion root is in the spring on a wet soggy day. Any location where the soiled is loose or was tilled the prior year will work perfectly. I like to collect dandelion root from my vegetable garden each spring before tilling and planting. Gather all the dandelion leaves and stem in your hand. Hold these as closely to the ground as possible, then pull very slowly to prevent the roots from breaking. If the soil is wet and the ground is loose enough it will come up without any problem.

2-After you have collected several dandelion roots, place them in a bucket and let them soak. This will make it easier to clean the roots later. Soak the roots 10 to 15 minutes. While your first batch is soaking, you can return to harvesting more dandelion root.

3-After the dandelion roots have soaked, remove them from the water. Rinse them again under running water. The dandelion roots are now ready to be used, roasted or dried.

4-The dried root can be ground in a coffee grinder and used to make dandelion root tea, sometimes called coffee. Dandelion root is useful in treating liver disorders. It is an excellent natural diuretic, because it is loaded with potassium, which is depleted with pharmaceutical diuretics. It also helps balance electrolytes, which is useful when someone suffers from flu symptoms such as vomiting or diarrhea.
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)10 Jan 2016 10:11
To: ALL9 of 14
The fall is the best time for harvesting the dandelion roots, from what I have read. There are other sites that the early spring is the best for the leaves and the roots. This is another good article about dandelions, the weed that cures...


http://www.living-foods.com/articles/dandelion.html

By: "Wildman" Steve Brill

Book Excerpt: COMMON DANDELION
(Taraxacum officinale)


The dandelion is a perennial, herbaceous plant with long, lance-shaped leaves. They’re so deeply toothed, they gave the plant its name in Old French: Dent-de-lion means lion’s tooth in Old French. The leaves are 3-12" long, and 1/2 - 2-1/2" wide, always growing in a basal rosette. The rosette’s immature, tightly wrapped leaf bases just above the top of the root form a tight "crown".

Dandelion’s well-known yellow, composite flowers are 1-2" wide. They grow individually on hollow flowerstalks 2-18" tall. Each flowerhead consists of hundreds of tiny ray flowers. Unlike other composites, there are no disk flowers. Reflexed bracts grow under each flower. The flowerhead can change into the familiar, white, globular seedhead overnight. Each seed has a tiny parachute, to spread far and wide in the wind.

The thick, brittle, beige, branching taproot grows up to 10" long. All parts of this plant exude a white milky sap when broken.

There are no poisonous look-alikes. Other very similar Taraxacum species, as well as chicory and wild lettuce (see page ØØ) only resemble dandelions in the early spring. All these edibles also exude a white milky sap when injured, but chicory and wild lettuce leaves have some hair, at least on the underside of the midrib, while Taraxacum leaves are bald. Unlike the other genera, Taraxacum stays in a basal rosette. It never grows a tall, central, stalk bearing flowers and leaves.

Dandelions are especially well-adapted to a modern world of "disturbed habitats," such as lawns and sunny, open places. They were even introduced into the Midwest from Europe to provide food for the imported honeybees in early spring. They now grow virtually worldwide. Dandelions spread further, are more difficult to exterminate, and grow under more adverse circumstances most competitors.

Most gardeners detest them, but the more you try to weed them up, the faster they grow. The taproot is deep, twisted, and brittle. Unless you remove it completely, it will regenerate. If you break off more pieces than you unearth, the dandelion wins. "What’s a dandelion digger for?" a dandelion asked. "It’s a human invention to help us reproduce," another dandelion replied.

Collect dandelion leaves in early spring, when they’re the tastiest, before the flowers appear. Harvest again in late fall. After a frost, their protective bitterness disappears. Dandelions growing in rich, moist soil, with the broadest leaves and largest roots, are the best. Select the youngest individuals, and avoid all plants with flowers. Some people eat the greens from spring to fall, when they’re very bitter. Others boil out the summer bitterness (and water-soluble vitamins) out in two changes of water. It’s all a matter of preference.

Dandelion greens are wonderful in salads, sautéed or steamed. They taste like chicory and endive, with an intense heartiness overlying a bitter tinge. People today shun bitter flavors—they’re so conditioned by overly sweet or salty processed food.

But in earlier times, we distinguished between good and bad bitterness. Mixed with other flavors, as in a salad, dandelions improve the flavor.

I also love sautéing them for about 20 minutes with onions and garlic in olive oil, adding a little homemade wine before they’re done. If you’re not used to the slight bitterness, cook them with sweet vegetables, especially sliced carrots and parsnips. Boiling dandelions in one or more changes of water makes them milder—a good introduction if you’re new to natural foods. Early spring is also the time for the crown—great sautéed, pickled, or in cooked vegetable dishes.

You can also eat dandelion flowers, or use them to make wine. Collect them in a sunny meadow, just before mid-spring, when the most flowers bloom. Some continue to flower right into the fall. Use only the flower’s yellow parts. The green sepals at the flower’s base are bitter. The flowers add color, texture, and an unusual bittersweet flavor to salads. You can also sauté them, dip them in batter and fry them into fritters, or steam them with other vegetables. They have a meaty texture that contrasts with other lighter vegetables in a stir-fry dish or a casserole. A Japanese friend makes exceptionally delicious traditional dandelion flower pickles, using vinegar and spices.

The taproot is edible all year, but is best from late fall to early spring. Use it as a cooked vegetable, especially in soups. Although not as tasty as many other wild root vegetables, it’s not bad. I remember finding large dandelions with huge roots growing on the bottom of a grassy hillside. They were only mildly bitter, so I threw them into a potato stock. With the added scallions, tofu, ginger, carrots and miso, this became an excellent Japanese miso soup.

Pre-boiling and changing the water, or long, slow simmering mellows this root. Sweet vegetables best complement dandelion roots. Sautéing the roots in olive oil also improves them, creating a robust flavor. A little Tamari soy sauce and onions complete this unusual vegetable side dish.

The leaves are more nutritious than anything you can buy. They’re higher in beta-carotene than carrots. The iron and calcium content is phenomenal, greater than spinach. You also get vitamins B-1, B-2, B-5, B-6, B-12, C, E, P, and D, biotin, inositol, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, and zinc by using a tasty, free vegetable that grows on virtually every lawn. The root contains the sugar inulin, plus many medicinal substances.

Dandelion root is one of the safest and most popular herbal remedies. The specific name, officinale, means that it’s used medicinally. The decoction is a traditional tonic. It’s supposed to strengthen the entire body, especially the liver and gallbladder, where it promotes the flow of bile, reduces inflammation of the bile duct, and helps get rid of gall stones. This is due to its taraxacin. It’s good for chronic hepatitis, it reduces liver swelling and jaundice, and it helps indigestion caused by insufficient bile. Don’t use it with irritable stomach or bowel, or if you have an acute inflammation.

The modern French name for this plant is pissenlit (lit means bed) because the root and leaf tea act on the kidneys as a gentle diuretic, improving the way they cleanse the blood and recycle nutrients. Unlike pharmaceuticals diuretics, this doesn’t leach potassium, a vital mineral, from the body. Improved general health and clear skin result from improved kidney function. One man I spoke to even claims he avoided surgery for urinary stones by using dandelion root tea alone.

Dandelions are also good for the bladder, spleen, pancreas, stomach and intestines. It’s recommended for stressed-out, internally sluggish, and sedentary people. Anyone who's a victim of excessive fat, white flour, and concentrated sweeteners could benefit from a daily cup of dandelion tea.

Dandelion root’s inulin is a sugar that doesn’t elicit the rapid production of insulin, as refined sugars do. It helps mature-onset diabetes, and I used it as part of a holistic regime for hypoglycemia. (low blood sugar).

Dandelion leaf infusion also good at dinnertime. Its bitter elements encourage the production of proper levels of hydrochloric acid and digestive enzymes. All the digestive glands and organs respond to this herb's stimulation. Even after the plant gets bitter, a strong infusion, is rich in vitamins and minerals, and helps people who are run-down. Even at its most bitter (Taraxacum come from Arabic and Persian, meaning "bitter herb"), it never becomes intolerably so, like golden seal and gentian.

The leaf's white, milky sap removes warts, moles, pimples, calluses, and sores, and soothes bee stings and blisters.

Unlike most other seeds, dandelions’ can germinate without long periods of dormancy. To further increase reproductive efficiency, the plant has given up sex: The seeds can develop without cross-fertilization, so a flower can fertilize itself. This lets it foil the gardener by dispersing seeds as early as the day after the flower opens.

Sexual reproduction leads to greater genetic diversity. This may be important for adapting to predators and parasites, which also change their genetic makeup to increase effectiveness. But the survival criteria vary from niche to niche. Moral: When maximum reproductive speed becomes the key to survival, don’t get caught by the evolution's lawnmower with your plants down!

A funny thing happened to me when I was collecting dandelions one day in Central Park. Two tour participants were undercover city Park Rangers. They had used marked bills, surveillance cameras, and walkie-talkies to infiltrate the group. When I ate a dandelion, the entire Parks Enforcement Patrol converged on my group, and I was handcuffed and arrested for removing vegetation from the park. But after I was fingerprinted, they couldn't hold me. I had eaten all the evidence.

I called every newspaper, TV station, and wire service The next day, when I went to get the paper, five cops stopped me. They wanted my autograph. I was on page one of the Chicago Sun-Times, in newspapers and on the radio around the country. WCBS Evening News with Dan Rather covered the story, national and local talk show appearances followed.

When I had to appear court, I served passersby and reporters "Wildman’s Five-Boro Salad," complete with dandelions, on the steps of the Manhattan Criminal Court, and the press ate it up once more.

A month later, the city dropped the charges, and hired me as a naturalist, to lead tours teaching people to eat dandelions and other wild foods. I worked for the New York City Parks Department for four years, leaving and resuming freelance activities after a new anti-environmental administration took office.
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)10 Jan 2016 10:15
To: ALL10 of 14
I was searching for cancer cures and found this article about dandelion root being a cure for a lot of cancers. However, the preparation of the root takes some time and the author of this article says that the dirt is not to be washed off. I question that as the root is the source of the ingredients, not the dirt.

This is from the Cancer Tutor site...

http://www.cancertutor.com/Cancer02/DandelionRoot.html

Dandelion Root Cancer Treatment

(Reprint of ad in The Northwest Herald)

George Cairns Writes:


Every week around 10,000 people die of cancer. Government figures show the death rate for cancer deaths has not changed in the last 10 years. Chemo and radiation only save around 10% of the people treated. So this shows our doctors don't have much to work with.

As this article goes on, I will explain how to prepare this plant and how much to take. There is nothing to buy. For some reason, the Lord has picked me to carry these words to you. I am only the delivery boy, and none of this is my idea. I do believe every word I write here, and I'm living proof it works.

The cost of printing is my thanks to God for giving me back my life and health.

A little over three years ago I was about done in with cancer. One morning I was waking up and hoping the end would come soon, a voice came to me and said. "You have to do something about your prostate cancer. Take the root of the dandelion. Don't expect a miracle. It took you a long time to get in this condition." The voice was gone.

I thought the voice was kidding to use the dandelion. When this voice tells you to do something, you do it. You must do it, like writing this article. It is the last thing I ever expected to do. Then I thought he didn't tell me how much to take or how to prepare it.

As soon as you could blink an eye, I knew how much to take, how to prepare it, and it would take 4 to 6 months to cure me. I also knew I wasn't to make a penny on it. As soon as I got around that morning, I dug some roots and started to prepare it.

About a week later I started taking it. Three weeks later the pain in my back and side was gone and my bowels had improved. Five and one-half months later they could find no cancer problem in me at all.

I then wanted to find someone else to try it, and that was the biggest problem yet. Nobody seems to want to help. When I told doctors, they just smiled as if I was nuts. Finally, I was telling a friend about it and he said he had a friend that was dying of lung cancer. He had it in both lungs and was bed ridden. They were tapping his lungs. He had been given 4 to 6 weeks to live.

After he had been on this powder about six weeks, he was up and around doing his chores and driving his car. He went to his doctor's office, and the doctors could not believe it. They took him to the hospital and gave him a CAT scan. They found no cancer lesions in his lungs and said it was a miracle.

I then put an ad in The Northwest Herald offering it free and four people said they would try it. Slowly one person told another and it spread. There was a fair amount of people taking it for different kinds of cancer and several for other things.

For instance, a man lost the use of his immune system and was told he wouldn't be able to work again for three years, in six months he is now working ½ days and feeling better.

I know this is not a cure all. It won't help everyone or all kinds of cancer. I know it is not a cure for skin cancer and it hasn't had luck with brain tumors. There is a doctor in Boston, Massachusetts that has developed a vaccine that is doing great things. This has been successful with prostate, colon, breast, liver and best of all with lung cancer. Five people have taken it for lung cancer and all five have been cured once.

The immune system controls the cancer cells in your body. As long as the immune system is healthy, you don't usually have a cancer problem. When your immune system gets run down, it loses control of the cancer cells, and they start eating live cells and this is what they call cancer.

This powder made from dandelion root has something in it that builds up the blood and the immune system. When the immune system is built up so far, it gets back control of cancer cells, and they do an about face and start cleaning up the mess they've made This is why you must have a fair appetite because your body must build itself up and be healthy if your immune system is going to be strong.

This will not work for people that have lost their appetite or are on CHEMO. Doctors try to blast the cancer out of your body with Chemo or radiation. By doing so, it destroys your immune system and appetite. These are the most important things your body needs to beat cancer.

Operations also knock the immune system haywire. This is why so many people that have operations for cancer find that a short time later it has spread somewhere else.

Many of the worst diseases that have plagued the world have been cured quite easily. When I was a boy, women dreaded the goiter more than cancer. A little iodine in the diet cured that. For hundred of years the most dreadeddiseases was leprosy and lockjaw. A doctor found he could produce penicillin from moldy bread and could cure them and many more things. How long has moldy bread been around?

I'm sure scientists will find many uses for the powder made from the root of the dandelions besides cancer. I have already found it builds up the blood so you heal much faster. To make the powder from the dandelion root you must follow my directions to the letter. Any changes and it won't work.

Dig a handful of dandelion roots any time of the year, it doesn't matter. Cut the leaves off just below the crown. DO NOT WASH. Then they must be dried around 100 degrees. I do it in an incubator with no water. You can also dry them under a heat light bulb if you raise or lower it so it's 100 degrees. You can also use the sun or put them in the attic if it's not too hot. It takes about 5 or 6 days in the incubator.

I have not done this all the way under the heat light. When you break a root and it snaps it is ready to powder. Take an old iron frying pan and a clean hammer. Take one root at a time and place in the frying pan and start tapping. Don't hit hard or it will fly all over the place. I put my hand around the root to keep most of it in the pan. If it sticks to the hammer and pan, and doesn't crumble in your fingers, it isn't dry enough. Keep it up until you have enough to start.

It takes about 20 minutes to ½ hour to prepare enough for a week. When you get used to it you can go much faster. I have an old vessel that druggists used to pound pills, this goes much faster. DO NOT USE AN ELECTRIC GRINDER, it won't work if you do. You lose too much of the good part in dust. You must do it as I have said or don't do it at all. I've tried shortcuts, but it seems someone was looking over my shoulder, and I know when I made a mistake.

I'm just an old farmer and not a scientist, so I wouldn't know the correct amount to take on my own. Now take a little over one half teaspoon once a day at any time and mix it with water, orange juice, etc. Do not use in soft drinks, liquor, or anything hot.

When mixed, use it all. Don't let it stand around. Keep the power in a dry place. After taking it three or four days, you will feel good, but nothing else. That is because your blood is building up. When you blood is happy, you're happy. In most cases, this will build your immune system in from three days to three weeks to the point it takes back control of cancer cells and thus the cancer stops spreading. In most cases it is going to help. There is no body feeling as it works. You just feel a little better each week.

After three weeks most of the pain will be gone in your back and you know it's working if you had pain there like I did. If you have bone cancer in the spine, it will take three months to work. This is not an overnight cure. It took a while to get in this condition and it will take a while for your body to heal.

The sooner you start, the quicker you will be over cancer. Young people heal faster than old people, but it will help at any age. I know because I'm 80 and have been taking it for over three years. No cancer has come back and no side effects except when my body has had enough, it lets me know by getting heart burn. Then I back off some. Some people get stomach aches when they need less. It also means your cancer is under control and you don't need as much.

You will also find you probably won't catch a cold while you are taking it full strength. The biggest enemy for this root is Chemo. The stronger the Chemo, the less chance the power has to help you as Chemo tears your immune system and appetite down, two of the most important things you need to cure cancer. There is only a ten percent chance Chemo will cure you. With no chemo, your chances are 75 to 80% but you must take it every day. Don't let your doctor give you that old threat if you turn him down that goes, "If you want to throw your life away, I can't stop you".

Just remember that 90% of the people that take his advice and take chemo are in the cemetery. Don't blame the doctor, he is doing his best with what he has to work with or you could ask for a written guarantee. I have only mentioned cancers that I know people have had and used this root. It should help pancreas cancer if taken before the appetite is gone and most body cancer.

This is food, not a drug. It shouldn't interfere with medicine your doctor may be giving you. Only two doctors have told patients to keep taking the power when they have made a miracle recovery. The rest of the doctors have run the power down and blasted the people even if the cancer has disappeared. The medical world is not going to accept this easily.

Going back to not washing the roots and leaving a little soil on them, it is for your own good. A good bit of immunity comes from the soil, it starts as soon as you are born. Your fingers touch something, and you put them in your mouth. A little dirt at first, and more as you grow older and start crawling. Then everything you touch goes in the mouth. When children go outside to play and when they come in, they are the dirtiest around the mouth and hand. The hands go in their mouths no matter how dirty they are.

Many diseases and bacteria live in the ground, but they don't seem to cause any trouble but it does build up the immune system. Some animals can't live if they can't eat a certain amount of soil. If you read this article over, you will see it all goes back to common sense.

I wish all of you people with cancer and other problems the best.

This ad does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Northwest Herald. The dandelion root power you can buy at a Health Food Store is not made the same way. It is not known to help cancer. This is a reprint of the ad in The Northwest Herald. Printing donated by Viking Lithographic, Elkhorn, WI 53121


George Cairns' New Instructions
[Note: After the original article was published, I talked to him on the phone and he told me he had newer and better instructions. He sent them to me and they are below. However, cancer patients cannot wait months to pick the dandelions at just the right time and wait more months to freeze, plant and harvest a new crop of dandelions. In this new article, concentrate on the harvesting and processing of the dandelions, and hope they are in season when you need them.]

To make dandelion root powder, let's start at the beginning. This would be collecting the seed. The seed is at the base of the white fluffy crown that appears when the yellow flower matures. Blow on them and they fly away. These little seeds do not grow until the next spring. I collect the seeds in May and June, then I put them in the freezer. This way you fool Mother Nature as the seeds must freeze before they grow. This way you can grow the seed the same year you collect them. Work up the land where you are going to plant them and spread the seeds on top of the ground and rake them [into the soil] very lightly and water [them]. I usually plant the seeds in August.

I dig up the seedlings the next April. I try to do all my transplanting in April as by the end of April they start blooming which takes the energy away from making roots. It's a good thing to pick the buds off for the first couple of months. When I dig the seedlings up in April, I plant them about 6 inches apart in rows 18 to 20 inches apart. I hoe them when needed and keep the weeds and grass out of them. After about 2 months you won't be able to hoe as they will cover the ground. Then I pull the weeds and grass out of the bed. Water when needed.

I usually start digging them up in October. By this time some of the roots will be 1 inch in diameter. I shake off most of the dirt [but not all] and slice lengthwise the bigger roots to about 1/4 inch so they will dry evenly. To dry them I use a forced-air incubator without any water in it. I set the incubator at 100 degrees or a little less. It takes about 5 days until they are ready to grind. You can use a dehydrator set around 100 degrees. If it doesn't have settings, don't use it. You can also dry in the sun if you put them in something the wind can blow through, like a small potato or onion sack. Hang them in the sun but take them down in late afternoon and put in a plastic sack and tie it. If you don't they will pick up moisture and you will be back where you started. Then put them out the next day when the sun is up. Once you have heat in the house, it's no trouble as they will dry OK most anywhere there is heat, like near a register or stove. The excess dirt will pop off as they dry. Mother Nature knows how much to leave. If the roots are very clean, add a little dirt as this powder won't work without the dirt.

When you make powder, try not to lose anything. Pound the roots flat, then put in an electric coffee grinder for 25 seconds and you have powder. You can also keep pounding and crumbling until you have it the right fineness. What I did for a long time, a friend gave me a cast iron pestle and mortar. With this you can get it down as fine as you wish.

To store, put in an air-tight jar and fill as near to the top as possible. I've kept it 10 months this way. Also, keep in a dry place.

George Cairns
Woodstock, Illinois, USA

= = = = = = = = = = = = =

Here is a vendor of dandelion root products:
http://www.catefarm.com/
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)10 Jan 2016 10:16
To: ALL11 of 14
I am posting this about dandelion roots so that I can come back to it later when I want to make dandelion coffee and dry the roots. This is the article I found about doing just that...

http://www.prodigalgardens.info/dandelion%20coffee.htm

Making Coffee from roasted Dandelion Roots

Dandelion Roots can be made into coffee and it has high nutritional value.


Coffee made from roasted Dandelion Roots has a deliciously unique taste. When brewed properly, it looks and taste just like coffee. I always get a positive response when I serve the coffee during my workshops. People are sometimes hesitant to taste it but the whole coffee pot disappears without you knowing it.

Dandelion Root is rich in vitamins and minerals and even micronutrients. It contains many components that are used in medicines, including inulin which is important in controlling diabetes.

Dandelion Coffee has a bitter flavor that is good for our body and it helps stimulate the digestive system, it starts from the cleansing and the absorbing of the nutrients that we take. This herb can be used as food or medicine. Unlike the coffee that is sold in the market, the Dandelion coffee has no harmful contents. People would be living healthy if they would start the day with a Dandelion Coffee.

Harvesting Dandelion Root Dandelions Roots grow vertically downwards with a length of a foot and a half, so you will need a good shovel than can take the roots from underground. Harvesting the roots early spring or late in fall is the best time to get the herbs medicinal and nutritional value. This is the season when the nutrients are mainly are stored on the roots. You can harvest the roots anytime to make Dandelion Root coffee.

It would be easier to harvest the roots when the ground is very soft or after rain. Digging the roots would become very difficult and hard if the ground is dry and hard so you have to check and plan carefully on when to harvest the roots. Harvesting the roots from a farm field that is plowed regularly is the best place because the soil is loose and that way the roots can grow very big which is easier for harvesting. Dandelions that grow in your backyard have very small roots.

Dandelions that have thick clumps of leaves would usually have roots that are nice and fat. You can also use a knife to cut the green leaves from the roots. To make 4 quarts of Dandelion root, you would need 5 gallons of roots. And this would give you 10 gallons of coffee. You can take the greens as well and freeze them for later. The greens can be more that the roots that you harvest so you have to carefully plan it. I usually collect for the entire year on both coffee and greens.

Scrubbing the roots by hand takes a lot of time and thus I have developed an efficient method to wash it in large quantities. Put the roots inside a bucket, fill the bucket with water. Stir or move the roots while inside the bucket until the water becomes muddy.

Pour off the muddy water and do the same process until such a time that the water is clear.

Use a large sharp knife to cut them into chunks. Put the chunks in a bowl and fill it up with water again. Stir it up with your hands again until you get cloudy water and pour it off afterwards then do the same process until the water becomes clear.

Grind the chunks using a food processor. Grind two cups of chopped roots into the food processor until you get a product that is a mixture that has coarse roots on it. Do the same procedure for left chopped roots, two cups per batch until everything has been grinded. You can also roast the roots first before grinding them but I personally find it faster and easier when they are freshly ground. You can also wash the mixture once again to be sure they are clean. If you prefer to wash them again, spread them over a clean towel until they are dry enough on order to save time spent in the oven.

Use a cookie sheet to roast the roots. Spread them on the sheet and roast them as much as you can to save oven time. Roast them over 250 degree with the oven door a little open as they are being roasted so that the moisture can get out of the oven. It takes two hours to roast them dry. The roots will shrink 1/4 from its original size. Stir them from time to time to ensure even roasting on all sides. Be careful, as they reach your desired color; take them out of the oven. Once they are dry, you can store them in glass jars.

Others would grind the roots so that they become powdered and ready for their coffee pot. I personally like the coffee when it coarse just likes tea.

In a cup of water, use a tablespoon of the roasted roots. You can also adjust the measurements to your own preference if you like your coffee strong or not. I simmer the roots in a coffee pot for 10-15 minutes until it has the same color of coffee. Not all people would like to go through the process in the preparation of the coffee. Others would just buy it from a local store; however, it is not pure dandelion root. It is a mixture of barley, rye, along with dandelion root, chicory roots and beetroots, which resembles Cafix, a substitute for coffee in the market.

Dandelion roots can also be used in some other beverage aside from coffee. We can make a spicy tea from these roots. This tea is called 'Chai' in Middle East but it is just tea in America. You will need:


a cup Roasted Dandelion root
6 tablespoons of Fennel or Anise seed
36 green pods of Cardamom
72 Cloves
6 sticks of Cinnamon
2 tablespoons of dried Ginger root
1½ teaspoon of black peppercorns
12 Bay leaves.


Add 1 tablespoon of tea mixture then simmer for 5minutes then add honey or brown sugar then add milk or cream. Reheat the mixture then it's ready.

The next chai is has a chocolaty flavor.
2 cups Roasted Dandelion root
½ cup Cinnamon bark
½ cup Ginger root
½ cup Cardamom seeds
½ cup Star Anise
Honey
Milk


Every 2 cups of water use 3 tablespoon. Simmer it for 10 minutes. Add milk and honey, then heat but do not boil. You can serve it either hot or cold.

This spicy tea is good for winter.
1 cup Roasted Dandelion root
½ cup dried Orange Peel
½ cup Cinnamon bark
¼ cup dried Ginger root


Per cup, use 1 tablespoon only. Simmer it for 10-15 minutes the use honey to sweeten it.

Here is a recipe for everyone who likes to explore.
2½ cups of heavy cream
1½ cups half-and-half
1¼ cups of sugar
5 egg yolks
Grind the roots and make it into a powder, and then set aside. Put the cream and sugar together in a pot then constantly stirring it while bringing it to a simmer. Add the powder while simmering; never bring it to a boil. Simmer it for 45 minutes. Strain the roots after. Whisk the egg yolks in a separate pot. Then slowly add the cream mixture. Heat again until the mixture becomes thick enough that can coat the spoon. Strain it again the chill. Freeze it on an ice cream maker following the instructions.

There are many other things you can make out of the roots.
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)10 Jan 2016 10:16
To: ALL12 of 14
This is the time of year where everyone is getting lawn service to get rid of the dandelions. That's a bad idea! Not only are you poisoning your environment, but you are destroying the miracle plant that can cure many diseases and make you healthy.

So instead of killing them with roundup and other chems, dig them up (right now is a perfect time) and put them in your salads. Check out all these health benefits of dandelions...

http://www.leaflady.org/health_benefits_of_dandelions.htm

Health Benefits of Dandelions

By Peter Gail


Suppose your doctor tells you, on your next visit, that he has just discovered a miracle drug which, when eaten as a part of your daily diet or taken as a beverage, could, depending on the peculiarities of your body chemistry: prevent or cure liver diseases, such as hepatitis or jaundice; act as a tonic and gentle diuretic to purify your blood, cleanse your system, dissolve kidney stones, and otherwise improve gastro-intestinal health; assist in weight reduction; cleanse your skin and eliminate acne; improve your bowel function, working equally well to relieve both constipation and diarrhea; prevent or lower high blood pressure; prevent or cure anemia; lower your serum cholesterol by as much as half; eliminate or drastically reduce acid indigestion and gas buildup by cutting the heaviness of fatty foods; prevent or cure various forms of cancer; prevent or control diabetes mellitus; and, at the same time, have no negative side effects and selectively act on only what ails you. If he gave you a prescription for this miracle medicine, would you use it religiously at first to solve whatever the problem is and then consistently for preventative body maintenance?

All the above curative functions, and more, have been attributed to one plant known to everyone, Taraxacum officinale, which means the "Official Remedy for Disorders." We call it the common dandelion. It is so well respected, in fact, that it appears in the U.S. National Formulatory, and in the Pharmacopeias of Hungary, Poland, Switzerland, and the Soviet Union. It is one of the top 6 herbs in the Chinese herbal medicine chest.

According to the USDA Bulletin #8, "Composition of Foods" (Haytowitz and Matthews 1984), dandelions rank in the top 4 green vegetables in overall nutritional value. Minnich, in "Gardening for Better Nutrition" ranks them, out of all vegetables, including grains, seeds and greens, as tied for 9th best. According to these data, dandelions are nature's richest green vegetable source of beta-carotene, from which Vitamin A is created, and the third richest source of Vitamin A of all foods, after cod-liver oil and beef liver! They also are particularly rich in fiber, potassium, iron, calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and the B vitamins, thiamine and riboflavin, and are a good source of protein.

These figures represent only those published by the USDA. Studies in Russia and Eastern Europe by Gerasimova, Racz, Vogel, and Marei (Hobbs 1985) indicate that dandelion is also rich in micronutrients such as copper, cobalt, zinc, boron, and molybdenum, as well as Vitamin D.

Much of what dandelions purportedly do in promoting good health could result from nutritional richness alone. Vogel considers the sodium in dandelions important in reducing inflammations of the liver. Gerasimova, the Russian chemist who analyzed the dandelion for, among other things, trace minerals, stated that "dandelion [is] an example of a harmonious combination of trace elements, vitamins and other biologically active substances in ratios optimal for a human organism" (Hobbs 1985).

Recent research, reported in the Natural Healing and Nutritional Annual, 1989 (Bricklin and Ferguson 1989) on the value of vitamins and minerals indicates that:

* Vitamin A is important in fighting cancers of epithelial tissue, including mouth and lung;

* Potassium rich foods, in adequate quantities, and particularly in balance with magnesium, helps keep blood pressure down and reduces risks of strokes;

* Fiber fights diabetes, lowers cholesterol, reduces cancer and heart disease

risks, and assists in weight loss. High fiber vegetables take up lots of room, are low in calories, and slow down digestion so the food stays in the stomach longer and you feel full longer;

* Calcium in high concentrations can build strong bones and can lower blood pressure;

* B vitamins help reduce stress.

Throughout history, dandelions have had a reputation as being effective in promoting weight loss and laboratory research indicates that there is some support for this reputation. Controlled tests on laboratory mice and rats by the same Romanians indicated that a loss of up to 30% of body weight in 30 days was possible when the animals were fed dandelion extract with their food. Those on grass extract lost much less. The control group on plain water actually gained weight.

Beyond nutritional richness, however, are the active chemical constituents contained in dandelions which may have specific therapeutic effects on the body. These include, as reported by Hobbs (1985):

* Inulin, which converts to fructose in the presence of cold or hydrochloric acid in the stomach. Fructose forms glycogen in the liver without requiring insulin, resulting in a slower blood sugar rise, which makes it good for diabetics and hypoglycemics;

* Tof-CFr, a glucose polymer similar to lentinan, which Japanese researchers have found to act against cancer cells in laboratory mice; Lentinan is a yeast glucan (glucose polymer) that increases resistance against protozoal and viral infections.;

* Pectin, which is anti-diarrheal and also forms ionic complexes with metal ions, which probably contributes to dandelion's reputation as a blood and gastrointestinal detoxifying herb. Pectin is prescribed regularly in Russia to remove heavy metals and radioactive elements from body tissues. Pectin can also lower cholesterol and, combined with Vitamin C, can lower it even more. Dandelion is a good source of both Pectin and Vitamin C;

* Coumestrol, an estrogen mimic which possibly is responsible, at least in part, for stimulating milk flow and altering hormones;

* Apigenin and Luteolin, two flavonoid glycosides which have been demonstrated to have diuretic, anti-spasmodic, anti-oxidant and liver protecting actions and properties, and also to strengthen the heart and blood vessels. They also have anti-bacterial and anti-hypoglycemic properties, and, as estrogen mimics, may also stimulate milk production and alter hormones;

* Gallic Acid, which is anti-diarrheal and anti-bacterial;

* Linoleic and Linolenic Acid, which are essential fatty acids required by the body to produce prostaglandin which regulate blood pressure and such body processes as immune responses which suppress inflammation. These fatty acids can lower chronic inflammation, such as proliferative arthritis, regulate blood pressure and the menstrual cycle, and prevent platelet aggregation;

* Choline, which has been shown to help improve memory;

*Several Sesquiterpene compounds which are what make dandelions bitter. These may partly account for dandelions tonic effects on digestion, liver, spleen and gall bladder, and are highly anti-fungal;

* Several Triterpenes, which may contribute to bile or liver stimulation;

* Taraxasterol, which may contribute to liver and gall bladder health or to hormone altering.

These chemicals, individually, are not unique to dandelions, but the combination of them all in one plant, along with high levels of vitamins, minerals, carbohydrates, proteins and fiber account for the many claims made regarding the plant.

These claims include the following results of clinical and laboratory research, again as reported in Hobbs (1985):

* A doubling of bile output with leaf extracts, and a quadrupling of bile output with root extract. Bile assists with the emulsification, digestion and absorption of fats, in alkalinizing the intestines and in the prevention of putrefaction. This could explain the effectiveness of dandelion in reducing the effects of fatty foods (heartburn and acid indigestion);

* A reduction in serum cholesterol and urine bilirubin levels by as much as half in humans with severe liver imbalances has been demonstrated by Italian researchers;

* Diuretic effects with a strength approaching that of the potent diuretics Furosemide and Lasix, used for congestive heart failure and cirrhosis of the liver, with none of the serious side effects, were found by Romanian scientists. They found that water extract of dandelion leaves, administered orally, because of its high potassium content, replaced serum potassium electrolytes lost in the urine, eliminating such side effects common with the synthetics as severe potassium depletion, hepatic coma in liver patients, circulatory collapse, and transmission through mothers' milk;

* In 1979 a Japanese patent was filed for a freeze-dried warm water extract of dandelion root for anti-tumor use. It was found that administration of the extract markedly inhibited growth of particular carcinoma cells within one week after treatment;

* Dental researchers at Indiana University in 1982 used dandelion extracts in antiplaque preparations;

* In studies from 1941 to 1952, the French scientist Henri Leclerc demonstrated the effectiveness of dandelion on chronic liver problems related to bile stones. He found that roots gathered in late summer to fall, when they are rich in bitter, white milky latex, should be used for all liver treatments;

* In 1956, Chauvin demonstrated the antibacterial effects of dandelion pollen, which may validate the centuries old use of dandelion flowers in Korean folk medicine to prevent furuncles (boils, skin infections), tuberculosis, and edema and promote blood circulation.

Also, Witt (1983) recommends dandelion tea to alleviate the water buildup in PMS (pre-menstrual syndrome).

There are many testimonials from those who have benefited from the use of dandelions in the treatment of what ailed them.

Robert Stickle, an internationally famous architect, was diagnosed as having a malignant melanoma 21 years ago, and was given, after radical surgery had not halted its spread, less than 2 years to live. He said, in a letter to Jeff Zullo, president of the Society for the Promotion of Dandelions, (June 23, 1986):

" I went on a search for the answer to my mortal problem, and [discovered] that perhaps it was a nutritional dilemma.... To me, cancer is primarily a liver failure manifestation. {Italians are very concerned about problems of the 'fegato']. [I discovered that] the cancer rate in native Italians is very low among the farming population (paesanos). When they get affluent and move to the city, its the same as the rest of civilized man. Paesanos eat dandelions, make brew from the roots, and are healthy, often living to over 100 years."

He states that he began eating dandelion salad every day, and his improvement confounded the doctors. When he wrote the letter in 1986, 18 years had passed and there had been no recurrence of the melanoma.

A benefit which comes from writing articles for national media is that you hear from people who have interesting stories to tell. I recently received a call from Peter Gruchawka, a 70 year old gentleman from Manorville, NY, who reported that he had been diagnosed with diabetes melitis 3 months before and was put on 5 grams of Micronase. At the time, he had a 5+ sugar spillover in his urine. He took Micronase for about a month before he learned, from his wife who is a nurse, that Micronase can do damage to the liver. He had read in "Herbal Medicine" by Diane Buchanan and "Back to Eden" by Jethro Kloss about the effectiveness of dandelions in controlling diabetes. Without saying anything to his doctors, he stopped taking Micronase and began drinking dandelion coffee each day. During the first week, his urinary sugar, measured night and morning, was erratic and unstable, but after a week, his sugar stabilized and when he called, he had been getting negative urine sugar readings for over a month. The doctors are amazed and can't explain it. An interesting side benefit to replacing Micronase with dandelion coffee is that, while Micronase damages the liver as a side effect, dandelions are particularly known for strengthening the liver.

According to Mr. Gruchawka, he changed nothing but the medication. He had cut out pastries and other sugars when he was diagnosed and started on Micronase, and has continued to do without those things while taking dandelion coffee.

In reporting these claims, however, I must add three qualifiers:

1. First, unfortunately, neither herbs nor synthetic remedies work for everyone in the same way. Different bodies respond differently to medicines, and what works incredibly well for one person may not work at all, or work less well, for someone else.

2. Second, good health results from a combination of healthy diet and enough exercise to keep the body toned. Bob Stickle, for all his insistence that dandelions cured him, changed, according to a mutual friend, his entire lifestyle. He didn't just add dandelion salad to what he was already doing.

3. People with health problems need to seek the advice and care of a competent physician, with whom this information can be shared. It is important to reemphasize that it is presented as information only. I am not a medical doctor, and neither advocate nor prescribe dandelions or dandelion products for use by anyone or for any ailment. Only your doctor can do that.

Because there are so many variables, it is hard to attribute Mr. Stickle's cure to any one of them directly. Likewise, Italian farmers live a lifestyle which combines a healthy diet, lots of work and clean air. They heat and cook with wood, which they have to cut and split. They haul water for household use. When they move to the city, diet, exercise, and environmental conditions change. Stress and sedentary habits increase.

And there is the importance of faith in the healing process, whether it be faith in God or faith in the curative properties of the herb being taken.

While dandelions, given all these variables, may never be proved to cure any specific ill, they are an extremely healthy green which cannot in any way hurt you. Research on how much you would have to eat to cause harm indicates that eating grass is more dangerous than eating dandelions (Hobbs 1985). Therefore, with everything going for dandelions, it is highly probable that everyone can derive at least some nutritional benefit from them by eating or drinking them regularly.

The medical and pharmacological establishment is generally critical of claims regarding the use of herbs on disease, and their concerns need to be put in perspective.

Herbal medicines have been used very effectively far longer than synthetics, and many current pharmaceutical products have been derived from research on plants used as medicine by many cultures. The problem with plants, however, is that they are available to anyone. It is impossible to patent a plant, and thereby gain proprietary rights to it. As a consequence, pharmaceutical companies attempt to isolate the active properties from medicinal plants and synthesize them so that they can patent them. Many of the synthetics have serious side-effects which were not present in the natural plant product, often because other chemicals in the plant offset them (i.e. the large quantities of potassium in dandelions which allows for potassium replenishment when dandelion is used as a diuretic).

USDA botanist Dr. James Duke (1989) suggests that a proper and appropriate "herbal soup", filled with "vitamins, minerals, fibers and a whole host of bioactive compounds," from which the body can selectively strain the compounds it needs to restore itself to health, will be more effective than synthetic medicines containing a "very select and specialized compound or two plus filler, usually non-nutritive." This is especially true if the "herbal soup", in the form of a potent potherb like dandelion, is a regular part of the diet so that the appropriate bioactive substances are present in the right amounts when the body needs them.
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)10 Jan 2016 10:17
To: ALL13 of 14
Once again it's early spring and it's a perfect time to pick the dandelion leaves from my yard. While I may look kind of weird going around the front yard harvesting dandelion leaves, it adds even more nourishment to my organic salads I make every night.

Now there are even more weeds growing in your lawn and garden that are probably packed with even more essential vitamins and nutrients that you are unaware of. From Natural News...

http://www.naturalnews.com/040176_edible_weeds_free_food_garden.html

Common backyard weeds for dinner? Delicious and nutrient rich fare at your fingertips that won't break the bank

Friday, May 03, 2013 by: Carolanne Wright


(NaturalNews) Instead of signing over your entire paycheck for organic produce, have you considered the bounty of nourishing fare growing wild right in your own backyard? Not surprisingly, edible weeds have come back into vogue as food prices continue to rise and budgets tighten. Tasty and nutritious, these humble plants ofter exceptional value (as in free) along with substantial health enhancing properties.

Forage and feast

Weeds are often viewed with a wary eye by gardeners as invasive intruders, not realizing these 'pests' are actually a terrific source of low-maintenance, healthy food. We can either wage a full out war against weeds with nasty chemicals along with long hours of backbreaking management, or we can simply consume the robust scoundrels. After all, as Andrea Karim of WiseBread notes, eating the scoundrels is much more satisfying than trying to fight a losing battle. Here are few examples to help inspire a bit of backyard foraging this summer.

Purslane
 
Purslane%25201.jpg


A hearty succulent herb, purslane resembles plump thyme. Leaves, stems, flowers and seeds are edible and can be harvested throughout summer. Add it to salad or soup. It can also be boiled, sauteed or blended into smoothies. An excellent source of alpha-linolenic acid, purslane provides five times more of this omega-3 fatty acid than spinach. The stems are also high in vitamin C.

Japanese knotweed
 
knotweedfresh.jpg


Similar in taste to asparagus and virtually indestructible, Japanese knotweed is a plant to be reckoned with. The tender shoots in springtime are best consumed when the leaves are still furled and the shaft crisp. Related to buckwheat, "Japanese knotweed is one of the last plants to blossom in late summer - early autumn in New England. Honey bees use its nectar, mixed with goldenrod nectar, to produce a honey as black as motor oil with a strong, distinctive flavor. It's good for sweetening baked beans and for brewing unusual beers and mead," according to Tom Meade of Hobby Farms. It's also rich in resveratrol, the anti-cancer, neuroprotective and anti-inflammatory nutrient found in the skin of red grapes. Vitamin C levels are impressive too.

Dandelion

Widely consumed throughout Europe, dandelion is just beginning to take a few tentative steps toward the American plate. Bearing in mind this somewhat bitter, yet refreshing green is an outstanding liver and blood cleanser and boasts high levels of vitamin A, a second look at dandelion is in our healthy best interest. The leaves and flowers can be sauteed or consumed raw while roasting and grinding the root produces a nutrient dense, caffeine free coffee substitute.

Other edible weeds include perilla, mare's tail, lambs quarter, sheep sorrel, stinging nettle and milkweed.

Foraging for food in your backyard is fun, economical and delicious -- just make sure to be safe. Erin Huffstetler, author of Edible Weeds, recommends the following harvesting guidelines:

1. Only harvest weeds that you can positively identify and know to be edible. The Complete Guide to Edible Wild Plants, by the Department of the Army is a good reference, if you aren't sure.

2. Avoid picking weeds close to roadways. They'll have absorbed exhaust fumes and road run off.

3. Avoid harvesting weeds in areas that may have been contaminated by animal feces.

4. Do not pick weeds from yards that have been treated with pesticides or herbicides.

5. Only eat the parts of plants that you know to be edible. Many edible plants have non-edible - and sometimes poisonous - parts.

Sources for this article include:

http://www.wisebread.com/free-food-in-your-yard-edible-weeds

http://frugalliving.about.com/od/eatforfree/tp/Edible_Weeds.htm

http://www.hobbyfarms.com/crops-and-gardening/edible-weeds.aspx

http://www.livescience.com/21496-5-edible-garden-weeds.html
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)10 Jan 2016 10:18
To: ALL14 of 14
The dandelion flowers are blooming across the northeast! Time to bring out the Roundup and get rid of them? No. In fact, it's time to start cutting the leaves and putting them in your salads. Dandelion leaves (and roots) are very powerful in maintaining your health. There's so many good nutrients and vitamins in dandelions that they should be considered a natural life saver.

Here's another article that proves how valuable dandelions are to your health...

http://www.naturalnews.com/045053_dandelion_liver_skin_problems.html

Improve overall health, including liver function and skin problems, with dandelion

Friday, May 09, 2014 by: Raw Michelle



(NaturalNews) Time to put the "dandelions are annoying weeds" thoughts to rest.

Its roots, sap and leaves are powerful ways to help heal the body, ranging from improving liver function to combating skin conditions such as eczema (1). In fact, according to the University of Maryland Medical Center, "Native Americans also boiled dandelion in water and took it to treat kidney disease, swelling, skin problems, heartburn and upset stomach." (2)

Dandelion has been used successfully across a variety of cultures, for several applications. It's no secret that it's an excellent way to keep the body healthy.

Here's a closer look at some of the top health benefits of dandelion.

How dandelion helps health

1. Maintains proper liver function. Dandelion root is known to prevent liver hemorrhaging, but it also improves blood purity and the flow of bile, which the liver manages and plays a role in.

2. Fights acne and eczema. Have a case of bad acne? Drinking dandelion juice acts as a stimulant, detoxifier, diuretic and antioxidant that helps to fight off toxins which often result from out-of-balance hormones. The toxins are ultimately sweat out through the skin and because of the juice's stimulating ability, pores are widened to help ease the process. Dandelion sap may also be used topically.

Furthermore, because its sap is highly alkaline and has germ-fighting properties, it's touted as an ideal way to manage a variety of skin conditions including general itching, eczema and ringworm.

3. Improve eye health. The American Optometric Association advises people consume at least 12 milligrams combined of lutein and zeaxanthin daily to help lowers the risk of cataracts and age-related macular degeneration (3). Dandelion greens contain both of these nutrients. In fact, just one cup exceeds the American Optometric Association's recommendation to maintain eye health, containing 15 milligrams of lutein and zeaxanthin.

4. Weight loss aid. Consuming dandelion greens is ideal for those trying to shed a few pounds. Not only are they low in calories, but they act as a diuretic, causing water weight to be omitted through urination in a safe manner.