How California shut the door to COVID-19 faster than NYS

From: Razz (RAZZMAN)18 May 2020 18:35
To: ALL1 of 50
People talk about how President Trump didn't act soon enough to shut the door on the Coronavirus. But New York Governor Andrew Cuomo was downplaying the virus as much as Trump was. By not acting fast enough, NYC and NYS became the hot zone for COVID-19 and it resulted in tens of millions of deaths.

Meanwhile, California got some cases even earlier than New York, but acted quickly to contain the threat.

https://www.propublica.org/article/two-coasts-one-virus-how-new-york-suffered-nearly-10-times-the-number-of-deaths-as-california?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Two Coasts. One Virus. How New York Suffered Nearly 10 Times the Number of Deaths as California.

California’s governor and San Francisco’s mayor worked together to act early in confronting the COVID threat. For Andrew Cuomo and Bill de Blasio, it was a different story, and 27,000 New Yorkers have died so far.


By March 14, London Breed, the mayor of San Francisco, had seen enough. For weeks, she and her health officials had looked at data showing the evolving threat of COVID-19. In response, she’d issued a series of orders limiting the size of public gatherings, each one feeling more arbitrary than the last. She’d been persuaded that her city’s considerable and highly regarded health care system might be insufficient for the looming onslaught of infection and death.

“We need to shut this shit down,” Breed remembered thinking.

Three days later in New York, Mayor Bill de Blasio was thinking much the same thing. He’d been publicly savaged for days for not closing the city’s school system, and even his own Health Department was in revolt at his inaction. And so, having at last been convinced every hour of delay was a potentially deadly misstep, de Blasio said it was time to consider a shelter-in-place order. Under it, he said, it might be that only emergency workers such as police officers and health care providers would be allowed free movement.

“I think it’s gotten to a place,” de Blasio said at a news conference, “where the decision has to be made very soon.”

In San Francisco, Breed cleaned up her language in a text to California Gov. Gavin Newsom. But she was no less emphatic: The city needed to be closed. Newsom had once been San Francisco’s mayor, and he had appointed Breed to lead the city’s Fire Commission in 2010.

Newsom responded immediately, saying she should coordinate with the counties surrounding San Francisco as they too were moving toward a shutdown. Breed said she spoke to representatives of those counties on March 15 and their public health officials were prepared to make the announcement on their own. On March 16, with just under 40 cases of COVID-19 in San Francisco and no deaths, Breed issued the order banning all but essential movement and interaction.

“I really feel like we didn’t have a lot of good options,” Breed said.

In an interview, California Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Mark Ghaly said it was critical to allow Northern California counties to rely on their own experts, act with a degree of autonomy and thus perhaps pave the way for the state to expand on what they had done. And three days after San Francisco and its neighboring counties were closed, Newsom, on March 19, imposed the same restrictions on the rest of California.

Breed, it turns out, had sent de Blasio a copy of her detailed shelter-in-place order. She thought New York might benefit from it.

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, however, reacted to de Blasio’s idea for closing down New York City with derision. It was dangerous, he said, and served only to scare people. Language mattered, Cuomo said, and “shelter-in-place” sounded like it was a response to a nuclear apocalypse.

Moreover, Cuomo said, he alone had the power to order such a measure.

For years, Cuomo and de Blasio, each of whom has harbored national political ambitions, had engaged in a kind of intrastate cold war, a rivalry that to many often felt childish and counterproductive. When de Blasio finally decided to close the city’s schools, it was Cuomo who rushed to make the public announcement, claiming it as his decision.

“No city in the state can quarantine itself without state approval,” Cuomo said of de Blasio’s call for a shelter-in-place order. “I have no plan whatsoever to quarantine any city.”

Cuomo’s conviction didn’t last. On March 22, he, too, shuttered his state. The action came six days after San Francisco had shut down, five days after de Blasio suggested doing similarly and three days after all of California had been closed by Newsom. By then, New York faced a raging epidemic, with the number of confirmed cases at 15,000 doubling every three or four days.

Health officials well understood the grim mathematics. One New York City official said of those critical days in March: “We had been pretty clear with the state about the implications of every day, every hour, every minute.”

As of May 15, there were nearly 350,000 COVID-19 cases in New York and more than 27,500 deaths, nearly a third of the nation’s total. The corresponding numbers in California: just under 75,000 cases and slightly more than 3,000 deaths. In New York City, the country’s most populous and densest, there had been just under 20,000 deaths; in San Francisco, the country’s second densest and 13th most populous, there had been 35.

CONTINUED...

https://www.propublica.org/article/two-coasts-one-virus-how-new-york-suffered-nearly-10-times-the-number-of-deaths-as-california?utm_source=pocket-newtab
EDITED: 18 May 2020 18:36 by RAZZMAN
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)19 May 2020 10:31
To: Carl (SPARTACUS) 2 of 50
Comparing how California reacted to the start of COVID-19 in America to how New York State reacted is like day and night. On the West Coast (including Washington State) the virus started there first. Yet in dramatic fashion, both states along the Pacific knew the implications of the virus and shut down their states just in the nick of time. Meanwhile, Governor Cuomo, reacted like President Trump and decided to ignore the warnings and act like it was similar to the seasonal flu.

The results of the two different strategies is clear. California and Washington State got it right, while the results in New York are a tragedy.

From the article above...

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, however, reacted to de Blasio’s idea for closing down New York City with derision. It was dangerous, he said, and served only to scare people. Language mattered, Cuomo said, and “shelter-in-place” sounded like it was a response to a nuclear apocalypse.

Moreover, Cuomo said, he alone had the power to order such a measure.

For years, Cuomo and de Blasio, each of whom has harbored national political ambitions, had engaged in a kind of intrastate cold war, a rivalry that to many often felt childish and counterproductive. When de Blasio finally decided to close the city’s schools, it was Cuomo who rushed to make the public announcement, claiming it as his decision.

“No city in the state can quarantine itself without state approval,” Cuomo said of de Blasio’s call for a shelter-in-place order. “I have no plan whatsoever to quarantine any city.”

“No city in the state can quarantine itself without state approval,” Cuomo said of de Blasio’s call for a shelter-in-place order. “I have no plan whatsoever to quarantine any city.”

Cuomo’s conviction didn’t last. On March 22, he, too, shuttered his state. The action came six days after San Francisco had shut down, five days after de Blasio suggested doing similarly and three days after all of California had been closed by Newsom. By then, New York faced a raging epidemic, with the number of confirmed cases at 15,000 doubling every three or four days.

Health officials well understood the grim mathematics. One New York City official said of those critical days in March: “We had been pretty clear with the state about the implications of every day, every hour, every minute.”

From: Carl (SPARTACUS)19 May 2020 11:47
To: Razz (RAZZMAN) 3 of 50
I agree. Mass did a bad job too.
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)19 May 2020 12:00
To: Carl (SPARTACUS) 4 of 50
I do feel that Cuomo did an adequate job after he finally closed down the state, but after reading that article, I feel he should have acted a couple weeks earlier. If he had, that would have saved tens of millions of lives.
From: Carl (SPARTACUS)19 May 2020 16:07
To: Razz (RAZZMAN) 5 of 50
No disagreement here.

But his handling of the nursing homes is a travesty. Further, once he realized he messed up: he got legislation passed protecting the nursing homes from any liability. The families of the dead should burn Albany.
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)19 May 2020 18:07
To: Carl (SPARTACUS) 6 of 50
Yea, nursing homes are the ground zero for the virus, everywhere. It isn't just in New York. I think that nursing home deaths rank as the #1 killer zone for COVID-19.
From: Carl (SPARTACUS)20 May 2020 09:14
To: Razz (RAZZMAN) 7 of 50
For sure. Cuomo has blood on his hands along with Baker in Mass and Murphy in NJ.
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)20 May 2020 16:14
To: Carl (SPARTACUS) 8 of 50
As I said, shoot me before I have to go to a nursing home! They shoot horses, don't they? LOL
From: Carl (SPARTACUS)21 May 2020 16:10
To: Razz (RAZZMAN) 9 of 50
With all this nursing home crap going on, I am surely going to come up with creative ways to keep people at home as much as possible.
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)22 May 2020 11:14
To: Carl (SPARTACUS) 10 of 50
Cuomo now has instructed insurance companies to pay for twice a week COVID tests on the nursing home staff and patients. The ins companies are balking at that.
From: Carl (SPARTACUS)22 May 2020 16:16
To: Razz (RAZZMAN) 11 of 50
Cuomo is covering the fact that his edicts caused the problem.
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)23 May 2020 11:02
To: Carl (SPARTACUS) 12 of 50
I told a friend that the NBA, NHL and the other major sports got it right, by closing up shop when they did. Most of the other states and countries did so a week too late. I think only California and Washington State got it right.
From: Carl (SPARTACUS)24 May 2020 10:09
To: Razz (RAZZMAN) 13 of 50
Well, covid did start on the West Coast. Not only did we start late, the pols overreacted and made the probs worse.
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)25 May 2020 09:25
To: Carl (SPARTACUS) 14 of 50
The East coast got hit from all the flights coming in from Europe, where it was spreading like wildfire. Italy was the worse case and people flew into NYC from there.
From: Carl (SPARTACUS)25 May 2020 16:45
To: Razz (RAZZMAN) 15 of 50
Agree. Hopefully we learn and this does not happen again.
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)26 May 2020 08:34
To: Carl (SPARTACUS) 16 of 50
We'll see if there's a spike of infections after this Memorial Day weekend. I predict there will be an explosion of new cases with everyone going to the beaches and having picnics.
From: Carl (SPARTACUS)26 May 2020 15:43
To: Razz (RAZZMAN) 17 of 50
Well, if the virus can be transmitted outdoors you might be right.
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)26 May 2020 17:28
To: Carl (SPARTACUS) 18 of 50
COVID-19 certainly can be spread outdoors. There was a soccer game in Italy last February and that resulted in an explosion of cases, and that was outdoors.

That's why they are insisting people wear masks outdoors, on the beach, etc.
From: Carl (SPARTACUS)27 May 2020 10:13
To: Razz (RAZZMAN) 19 of 50
I cannot find any study which confirms the virus can be spread outdoors. I do hear that it is happening but it is all hearsay.
From: Razz (RAZZMAN)27 May 2020 12:00
To: Carl (SPARTACUS) 20 of 50
There have been reports about it spreading while outside, especially if one is within the 6 foot safe distance. Here's the article about that outdoor soccer game in Italy which helped the explosion of the virus in that country...

https://www.thescore.com/esp_fed/news/1967128

If it weren't a factor, the White House, the CDC and others wouldn't recommend wearing masks outside if you could come in close contact with people.

https://www.cnet.com/health/face-masks-in-stores-cars-outside-heres-where-youre-expected-to-wear-a-covering/

https://www.hackensackmeridianhealth.org/HealthU/2020/04/20/should-you-wear-a-mask-outside/